interview

Ryan Stewart 11-04-2014

Maria Hinojosa, left, speaks with Yolanda Sayres, right, about healthcare and education in Rochester, New York. Photo via ABTN.

“Behind every number, there’s a story.”

That’s what inspires Maria Hinojosa, host and executive producer of NPR’s Latino USA, to investigate the dramatic demographic changes taking place in the United States in her new PBS showAmerica by the Numbers. In a nation that will be majority non-white by 2043, Hinojosa’s storytelling focuses largely on the oft neglected experiences of immigrants and people of color.

Unafraid of what mainstream media too often neglects, Hinojosa’s America by the Numbers brings to life the tensions at the heart of a rapidly diversifying America. She examines not only the unjust treatment of underrepresented communities by the American government but also the cultural conflicts inherent within these communities. For Hinojosa, the conflicts between tradition and progress, community and individuality, white and non-white are not to be avoided, but rather spotlighted.

Last week, Sojourners chatted with Hinojosa about America by the Numbers and the role the media can play in welcoming these demographic changes. This conversation has been lightly edited for length and clarity.

Rebecca Kraybill 8-05-2014

Kelly and Peter Shenk Koontz near Kabul. Photo by Grace Royer.

Peter and Kelly Shenk Koontz know the difficulties and joys of peacebuilding in Kabul, Afghanistan.

Rebecca Kraybill 6-04-2014

Katerina Friesen

Katerina Friesen, a seminary student, knows the labor of love of land-based ministry.

Rebecca Kraybill 6-03-2014

Daniel Beaty in "Through the Night"

A conversation with writer and performer Daniel Beaty.

The Editors 5-14-2014

Matthew Vines sits down with Sojourners to discuss his first book, God and the Gay Christian: The Biblical Case in Support of Same-Sex Relationships.

Jason Howard 5-09-2014

Denise Giardina

A conversation with novelist and activist Denise Giardina.

Rebecca Kraybill 4-03-2014

Tyrone Parker, top row in red, with Alliance of Concerned Men participants.

Tyrone Parker works with urban youth and families in the nation's capital.

Christian Piatt 3-04-2014
Courtesy of Tony Kriz

Tony Kriz and his new book, 'Neighbors and Wise Men.' Courtesy of Tony Kriz

Tony Kriz is, in many ways, the definitive postmodern Christian. He’s a Christian writer, teacher, and he even lives in intentional community with fellow Christ-seekers. He comes from an evangelical background, and, though he claims portions of the theology of his youth, he also continues to reinvent himself as he forges the path of Christ in his cultural context.

Known first in the public eye as “Tony the Beat Poet” from Donald Miller’s bestselling book, Blue Like Jazz, he is a voice and a presence unto himself. He’s more inclined to meet friends over a beer than he is to join a particular congregation in worship every Sunday. He is both deeply embedded in the Christian conversation and cultural identity and, at the same time, a stark contrast to what tradition dictates a “good Christian” should look and act like.

I shot a handful of questions his way after a recent book discussion we conducted at First Christian Church in Portland. Here’s what he had to say.

Rebecca Kraybill 2-04-2014

Carol Roth (Photo courtesy of Everett J. Thomas/The Mennonite)

Carol Roth, a staff leader with Native Mennonite Ministries, connects Native Mennonites with the broader Mennonite church.

Brandon Hook/Sojourners

Jim Wallis talks to reporters at the #Fast4Families tent. Brandon Hook/Sojourners

Listen as Sojourners CEO Rob Wilson-Black asks Jim Wallis about his recent fast for immigration reform.

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Dawn Cherie Araujo 8-02-2013

Photo by Dawn Araujo

Khaipi, a peace studies professor in Thailand and a Chin religious freedom activist

Has the uptick in Christians eager to adopt overseas done more harm than good?

Comic book creator Gene Luen Yang on his latest work, Boxers & Saints.

Catherine Meeks

I suppose I could live my life saying, "I will never allow myself to try to understand white people. I will cut myself off from them. I will live my life as a black woman, and I'll just keep white people in boxes." But to do that means to keep myself cut off from a part of myself. And if white people do that about black people, I think the same is true: It keeps them cut off from a part of themselves.

For those of us who are Christians, I don't think we have any choice in the matter. I think God has made it clear that we're to be reconciled to God and each other. And if we're to be reconciled to each other, that includes everyone who happens to be in the world with us.

Reconciliation demands that you not take sides; it demands that you take a stand, I think—a stand that's maybe a merging of a lot of different pieces that represent several different kinds of philosophical stances. I think that one who chooses a road of reconciliation must be willing to look at more than one side of the coin.

Elaina Ramsey 7-25-2013

Thokozile Beatrex Phiri

The Global Fund has a plan to win the fight against the three major diseases of poverty—and it's working.

Dawn Cherie Araujo 6-05-2013

Susan Burton, photo by Kathleen Toner

Susan Burton, founder of A New Way of Life Reentry Project

Mary Theresa Webb 6-05-2013

An interview with Sen. Ehab El Kharrat, a Christian member of Egypt's Parliament, on why he sees the country as a "work in progress."

Brandon Hook 4-17-2013
Brandon Hook/Sojourners

The Last Bison talked with Sojourners about music, creativity, and God. Brandon Hook/Sojourners

Chesapeake, Virginia-based folk band The Last Bison talked with Sojourners about music, creativity, and God before their show in Washington, D.C. a while back. Be sure to listen to their recently released debut album Inheritance and catch them while they're on tour in the U.S.! Their music is definitely worth a listen.

Dawn Cherie Araujo 4-04-2013

Sophoan Rath. Photo by Dawn Araujo.

Sophoan Rath, survivor of the Khmer Rouge regime

Elizabeth Palmberg 2-12-2013

A message on a barn at Dawn Farm.

An extended interview with addiction-recovery worker Jim Balmer.

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