Slavery

John Hope Franklin lived through most of the twentieth century. He was a gentle man, a scholar, an activist, and a truth-teller. He studied history and he helped to make it.

Jeff Brazil 03-17-2009
It is said that everyone in the world is Irish today in honor of Saint Patrick.
Edward Gilbreath 03-10-2009
An article in the Chicago Tribune caught my attention this week.
Lauren Maxwell 01-30-2009
When I think of Immokalee, my mind remembers a place where reconciliation has come alive.
Jim Wallis 01-27-2009
Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton, graced the front pages of many newspapers across the country last Friday.
Lynne Hybels 01-15-2009
In 2001, my husband Bill was jolted out of racial complacency.
Lisa Sharon Harper 01-12-2009
Sunday, January 11 was National Human Trafficking Awareness Day. I wrote this poem, And to the Little Ones, in honor of the day.
Randy Woodley 01-12-2009
We stand at what could be the greatest divide in American history.
Joseph D'souza 12-22-2008
More people around the world will watch Barack Obama's inauguration than any other presidential inauguration in history.
Jennifer Svetlik 12-18-2008
Eight years ago, the United Nations proclaimed Dec. 18 as International Migrants Day.
Aaron Taylor 12-08-2008
Soldiers entering villages and killing people on sight. Landmines blowing pregnant women to smithereens. There's no way this is really going on. The world would never tolerate this.
Kierra Jackson 11-18-2008

On this day in 1797, Isabella Baumfree (Sojourner Truth) was born in Ulster County, New York. Sojourner Truth was a former slave, women's rights activist, abolitionist, and great orator. On November 26, 1883, Sojourner passed away in her home in Battle Creek, Michigan.

Jimmy McCarty 11-13-2008
Social location is vital to understanding how people come to their interpretations, and appropriations, of the Bible and its stories.
Ben Sanders III 08-08-2008

On July 29, 2008, history was made in the United States House of Representatives – well, kinda. Last week, the House formally apologized for slavery, Jim Crow, and for the racist social consequences that have followed. Never before has the U.S. government publicly apologized for the social institution that reduced Africans to chattel. On one hand, I was humbled, not by the apology, but by the tremendous sacrifice that led to it. To be in a moment where the U.S. House of Representatives [...]

Jim Wallis 07-31-2008

I'm still "down under" -- wrapping up my book tour in Australia. The news from the U.S. reminds me of Prime Minister Kevin Rudd’s first act on the day after his swearing in as prime minister. In a moving speech, he delivered a speech of apology to the aboriginal people.

Tuesday, for the first [...]

Benjamin Marsh 07-04-2008

Slavery in the United States did not end in a night or even a year or decade. Even now, long past slavery's demise, the twin poisons of racism and class oppression echo as terrible reverberations from our forefathers' horrific acceptance and perpetuation of brutal violence against their fellow humans. The whips and chains are gone, but the hatred and violence too often well up while inequitable social policies ensure the longevity of poverty for certain classes of people. Even after 150 [...]

Adam Taylor 07-01-2008

In the shadow of India's economic miracle lies a people often deemed untouchable, largely impoverished, and seemingly invisible. Bubbling beneath the shimmering image of a new India is a cauldron of inequality, caste-based subordination, and religious tension that could boil over into even greater civil strife and violence. At the center of these forces lies the Dalit struggle. While Dalit rights are often denied and hopes are crushed, growing political, economic, and spiritual empowerment [...]

Apologies for slavery must be followed by steps to justice.

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