Science

Randy Woodley 10-12-2009
Gurgen Bakhshetsyan / Shutterstock.com

Photo via Gurgen Bakhshetsyan / Shutterstock.com

As an explorer, Columbus was not the first to reach the Western Hemisphere. Native Americans had been here for 10,000-20,000 years, and Vikings and Chinese are among those others who hold prior claims. Even after four attempts, Columbus never realized his goal of finding a western ocean route to Asia. As a “founding father type figure” he never set foot in what is now considered America but landed in the present day Bahamas, Cuba, and Haiti. 

As a Christian example he enacted terrible cruelties to friendly natives: assuming unlawful rights of authority; robbing and subjugating whole nations of their freedom and entire capital; allowing his men to rape, murder and pillage at will; and deliberately leading the way for the genocide of millions, considered by many to be the worst demographic catastrophe in recorded history.

So why do Americans celebrate Columbus Day?

Randy Woodley 10-09-2009
There's a joke that re-surfaces in Indian country every so often.
Ernesto Tinajero 8-24-2009
I remember playing WWII as a boy. We would pick sides of American and Nazis. Of course, everyone wanted be the Americans, the good guys.
Cesar Baldelomar 8-19-2009
As debates rage over the proposed health-care reform (which I strongly support), I believe many politicians, activists, religious leaders, and ideologues are missing an essential point.
Despite the rhetoric, science and faith get along just fine.
A journalist explores the science of spirituality.

When I began writing this column back in 1985, my page could hold up to 1,000 words. Over the years that number has shrunk, first to 800, then 700.

Elizabeth Palmberg 11-01-2008

Classic books on science fiction and spirituality.

The difficulty - and necessity - of finding a middle ground on stem cells.
Chap Clark 4-01-2007
What does it mean to use life to give life?
Wayne C. Wolsey 9-01-2006

Helen Caldicott has gotten her facts mixed up and relies on invalid assumptions in her commentary (“Our Friend the Atom?” July 2006).

Daniel Charles 8-01-2006

The pursuit of knowledge was his true faith. And in many ways, it remains ours today.

Gail A. Bruder 3-01-2006

While agreeing with Ted Peters (“Intelligent Religion,” December 2005) that one can both embrace the science of Darwinian theory and be religious, I take exception to his assertion that “the scientific establishment tries to assert that to be religious is like having a disease that quarantines a person against participation in science.” I don’t believe there is any such ideology in the scientific community. As a scientist, I would ask for his evidence of such a position.

Ted Peters 12-01-2005
Are science and faith really incompatible?
Julie Polter 1-01-2003

Nobel Prize-winning physicist Bill Phillips talks about his faith

Ed Spivey Jr. 5-01-2001

It's no surprise that humans are smarter than roundworms. Well, most humans, anyway.

When science meets religion, who wins?

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