Ed Spivey Jr. 08-05-2014

Illustration by Ken Davis

America should be like a box of crayons, but with fewer colors.

Ed Spivey Jr. 07-09-2014

Illustration by Ken Davis

"Please report to Window #12. And bring your Bible."

Ed Spivey Jr. 06-04-2014

Illustration by Ken Davis

And they're using it for themselves.

Jim Wallis on The Daily Show Sojourners founder, author and theologian Jim Wallis has been a guest on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart multiple times since 2005 to discuss the intersections of politics, religion and activism. In this throwback clip from Jon Stewart’s early days on the Comedy Central staple (starting at 12:52 in the video below), the two discuss Wallis’ popular book God’s Politics. The discussion primarily involves the religious implications of the then current political issues, morality and activism. But in a more personal moment, Wallis tells Stewart (who is Jewish), “The Hebrew prophets used humor and truth-telling to make their point. Which I think you do very well. So maybe you’re one of the prophets.”
Ed Spivey Jr. 05-12-2014

Illustration by Ken Davis

...although maybe we should have kept a little for ourselves.

Ed Spivey Jr. 04-03-2014

Illustration by Ken Davis

Another test of biblical authority by unscrupulous scientists.

Ed Spivey Jr. 03-05-2014

Illustration by Ken Davis

It's only New Jersey. So fugetaboutit.

Ed Spivey Jr. 02-10-2014

Illustration by Ken Davis

Okay, so maybe not actually die. Just change. And quickly.

Ed Spivey Jr. 01-05-2014

Illustration by Ken Davis

No animals were tested in the study. Just me.

Ed Spivey Jr. 12-12-2013

Ilustration by Ken Davis

Don't make promises you can't keep.

Ed Spivey Jr. 11-05-2013

Illustration by Ken Davis

Sorry, kids, but Santa has some bad news.

Ed Spivey Jr. 10-02-2013

Illustration by Ken Davis

Domestic space flight is an idea whose time has come.

Kathy Khang 09-25-2013
Screen shot of image on Rick Warren's Facebook page

Screen shot of image on Rick Warren's Facebook page

Author's Note: As of sometime Tuesday afternoon, the original Facebook post and tweet of this image has been removed. That is wonderful news. He has also issued an apology on Dr. Sam Tsang’s blog (linked later in this post) but not on his Facebook page or Twitter because it has all been removed. However, I am leaving up my original post because deleting something doesn’t actually address the issue, and the subsequent comments by supporters were never addressed. Those supporters may think the post was removed because he got tired of the angry Asians who don’t get it. Right now, it feels like I’ve been silenced. Pastor Warren actually did read many of the comments voicing concern about the post and responded with a rather ungracious response. My kids constantly hear me talk about the consequences of posting something up on social media and the permanence of that. 

You know it’s going to be an interesting day when you wake up to Facebook tags and messages about “something you would blog about.”

My dear readers, you know me too well.

This photo appeared yesterday on Rick Warren’s Facebook page and Twitter feed. Apparently the image captures “the typical attitude of Saddleback Staff as they start work each day.” Hmmm. I didn’t realize Saddleback was akin to the Red Army. Warren’s defense (and that of his supporters) is one that  I AM SO SICK AND TIRED OF HEARING!

Cathleen Falsani 09-16-2013

“An illustration of the pope from the side.” by Hamilton Cline, Daly City, Calif. Via RNS

When I see him smiling on TV or on the cover of a magazine in the checkout line at the grocery store, I get the warm fuzzies.

I follow him religiously on Twitter and have a Google news alert set up so I don’t miss a morsel of his latest awesomeness.

The photo meme of him smiling gape-mouthed at a little girl accompanied by the words, “You love Jesus too?!” is my screensaver, and I wear a pendant with a tiny image of him on one side and of St. Francis on the other.

Ed Spivey Jr. 08-02-2013

Illustration by Ken Davis

If you have something to hide, hide it better.

Ed Spivey Jr. 07-01-2013

Designed by Ken Davis

Sorry. Disasters aren't budgeted this year.

Christian Piatt 05-20-2013
'The Invisible Girls' cover. Photo via Jericho Books

'The Invisible Girls' cover. Photo via Jericho Books

Sarah Thebarge is the author of The Invisible Girlsa new memoir from Jericho Books. I was fortunate to get a few minutes to ask her a few questions about her touching, funny, compelling new piece of work.

Q:  Your book is about Somali Refugees and also about your survival of breast cancer.  How do you write one book about both things?

A:  When I met the Somali mom and her girls on the MAX the first time, we had a lot of differences – different religions, ethnicities, skin color, and language. But as I developed a relationship with them, I realized that we had a lot in common at the core. Because I’d been a little girl growing up in a fundamentalist culture, where men buried you under yards of fabric and lists of rules and taught you that women were supposed to be silent.  And I knew what it was like to be a refugee of sorts, because after I nearly died of cancer in my 20s, I sold everything I had and got on a plane with a suitcase of clothes and flew from the east coast to Portland, Ore., and started over. And so even though the narrative lines of the Somali refugee family and my cancer experiences seem disparate, they actually weave together well, because all this time, I’d been an Invisible Girl, too.

Ed Spivey Jr. 05-11-2013

By Ken Davis

When wedding bells ring, don't forget the jello.

Jason Byassee 05-11-2013

When "Spiritual but Not Religious" Is Not Enough: Seeing God in Suprising Places, Even the Church. Jericho Books

Cathleen Falsani 05-07-2013
Photo by Karen Tapia/Orange County Register.

Director and screenwriter, Tom Shadyac, right. Photo by Karen Tapia/Orange County Register.

“I find hypocrisy all over our lives – especially mine – and certainly in the church. … I think Jesus loves everybody. Everybody. The second we call somebody a ‘nonbeliever,’ we have put a wall up between us and them. They are all children of God.”

With a wink and a crazy-eyed smile, Shadyac was, ostensibly, calling the crowd on its own … uh … baloney.

“Forgive me, I’m personally a little tired – God’s not, but I am – of khaki-wearing, Docker-delivering, Christianity,” he said. “If you’re out there in Dockers or khakis: God loves you, but I’m still a work in progress.”

And, when given the chance, Shadyac gently corrected the tacit implication that Hollywood is Babylon.

“You know what I would say to the church, to you guys, if I had to? ‘Come on. Let’s stop it,’” the director began. “We have become so whitewashed that when I literally say the word ‘ass’ – which is actually in the anatomical dictionary – because we are so born of the Puritan fear [you freak out]. Guess what? God made the ass. He made the ass.

“You’ve just gotta get over that. I don’t believe the world is godless. Because if I believe in omnipresence and omniscience, and I take the Word at its word, that God is in EV-ERY-THING,” he said. “When another person is loving another person, God is all over their lives. I don’t need to judge them and to tell them where God is in or out or what words they need to say. That is not up to me.”