Urban Ministry

Dave Baker 03-09-2015

Where the Cross Meets the Street: What Happens to the Neighborhood When God is at the Center. IVP Books. 

Julie Polter 04-03-2014

St. Peter's B List: Contemporary Poems Inspired by the Saints by Ave Maria Press / Making Neighborhoods Whole: A Handbook for Christian Community Development by IVP Books / Noah's Flood: Ancient Stories of Natural Cataclysm by Ingrid Esther Lilly / iGods: How Technology Shapes Our Spiritual and Personal Lives by Brazos Press

How taking it to the streets is changing theological education.

Leroy Barber 05-11-2013

Five principles for a lasting marriage.

Stephen Mattson 03-15-2013
Chicago skyline,  rSnapshotPhotos / Shutterstock.com

Chicago skyline, rSnapshotPhotos / Shutterstock.com

I used to lead and organize inner-city mission trips. Churches, youth groups, non-profit organizations, and well-intentioned philanthropists would excitedly arrive within the diverse and fast-paced world of Chicago and enthusiastically dive into whatever tasks we gave them. The work they volunteered for made a huge difference in people’s lives, but more importantly, it dramatically challenged — and changed — their own way of thinking about urban ministry.

For years “The City” has been the pet project of Christians throughout America. Billions of mission trips have been made to homeless shelters, food pantries, and poor neighborhoods, all in an effort to “clean up,” “rehabilitate” and “evangelize” in Christ’s name. Unfortunately, the inner-city isn’t as stereotypical as we want it to be, and our missionary zeal can often cause more harm than good.

Here is the most common myth that Christians mistakenly apply to urban areas: The Inner-City is Morally Bankrupt.

Christian Piatt 01-16-2013
Photo: Downtown Portland, DRGill / Shutterstock.com

Photo: Downtown Portland, DRGill / Shutterstock.com

It’s easier to guide the vision and mission of a church you start. It’s another thing to help a 135-year-old congregation reimagine what it means to be a downtown urban church in a world that has changed dramatically all around it. At Milagro, the church we founded in our living room some nine years ago, we set the course for what we wanted that community to look like: a refuge for the spiritual walking wounded, safe haven for questions, doubt, and a culture of mutual encouragement, support, and accountability that would allow people to explore their own relationship with the Divine. We have since set that community free and already, it is becoming something different.

As well it should.

Now we find ourselves at First Christian Church in downtown Portland — a different animal entirely. In some ways, the two communities are very complementary, in that one has what the other tends to lack. But we’ve discerned that, first and foremost, our job is to help cultivate a spirit of radical openness and welcome. But what does this mean, and how do we even begin to change the makeup of an institution that has exited for more than five generations before us?

Sometimes, it’s the simplest things that say the most. We had a tradition at Milagro of “mugging” people when they came for the first time. This meant one of our hospitality stewards (AKA, “muggers”) would approach them and give them a coffee mug filled with candy and some information about the church. With First Christian, however, most people know we’re here; the bigger question lingering in the public mind is why.

In this case, instead of a brochure describing programs or institutional history, Amy included the welcome statement that follows, which she borrowed and adapted from a Catholic community.

Michelle Garcia 09-01-2012

The Street Psalms community pursues theology from below—and that changes everything about how "missionary" work is done.

Theresa Cho 01-05-2011
"Deborah was a prophet, the wife of Lappidoth. She was judge over Israel at that time. She held court under Deborah's palm between Ramah and Bethel in the hills of Ephraim.
My friend Joe told me the story of relocating his family to be part of a church that takes community seriously.
Onleilove Alston 01-26-2010

After college I completed a year of service with Public Allies New York, an Americorps service program.

Rodolpho Carrasco 12-10-2009
A while back, I was in a situation where I was mocked publicly in front of 300-plus young leaders. There were racial overtones.
Bart Campolo 03-16-2009
I stayed up way too late in a Buffalo hotel room the other night, eating string cheese and Oscar Mayer salami from the convenience store across the parking lot, watching the tail end of the Connect
Bart Campolo 11-19-2008
Twelve years ago our dear friend Julia took a badly neglected baby boy away from his crackhead mother and made him her own.
Jim Wallis 10-16-2008
Pastor Adam Hamilton talks about how his suburban megachurch engages issues of social justice in the education system of their inner-city
Bart Campolo 10-01-2008
Remember Bobbie Williams, the tough but hopeful friend we sent to truck-driving school back in May?
Leroy Barber 09-19-2008
I believe that every dedicated family following Jesus is a great instrument for the kingdom of God. A family serving together is a picture of God's love and grace.
Bart Campolo 09-09-2008

The other day Marty invited some neighborhood kids over to help with a mailing she brought home from work. Before they got started, she sent 12-year-old Heather across the street to fetch 13-year-old Jasmine, who has been part of our fellowship from the very beginning. Heather returned a few minutes later, alone and puzzled.

"They were in there, but they wouldn't open the door" she told Marty. "Jasmine's mother said you need to call her."

You [...]

Sharaya Tindal 09-08-2008

[see all posts in this conversation on New Monastics and race.]

The very first mark of the New Monastic movement is to relocate to the abandoned places of the empire. However, after quick research, most of the social justice-geared intentional communities I found were either [...]

Bart Campolo 08-15-2008

I've been on lots of roads trips, but none of them compare to The Walnut Hills Fellowship's weekend journey to Chicago. Start to finish, it was a thing of rare beauty. We had been talking about it for months, of course, but I think most of our neighborhood friends still didn't really believe it was going to happen. After all, people around here are always talking about things they don't really intend to do. [...]