transcendence

Sam Harris Wants Atheists – And Everyone Else – to Get Spirituality

Sam Harris describes how spirituality must be divorced from religion. Photo via Simon & Schuster Publicity/RNS.

Uber-atheist Sam Harris is getting all spiritual.

In his new book, “Waking Up: A Guide to Spirituality Without Religion,” the usually outspoken critic of religion describes how spirituality can and must be divorced from religion if the human mind is to reach its full potential.

“Our world is dangerously riven by religious doctrines that all educated people should condemn,” he writes in the book, but adds: “There is more to understanding the human condition than science and secular culture generally admit.”

The prescription, Harris holds, is Buddhist-based mindfulness meditation. A Stanford-trained neuroscientist, Harris is a long-time practitioner of Buddhist meditation. He said everyone can, through meditation, achieve a “shift in perspective” by moving beyond a sense of self to reach an enlightening sense of connectedness — a spirituality.

VIDEOS: God's Greatness

In “God Sets the World Right” (Sojourners, June 2014), Joy J. Moore reflects on the lectionary readings for the month by highlighting musician Nicole C. Mullen and theologian Ellen F. Davis—two women who articulate the goodness of God in their own unique ways. Watch the following videos of Mullen and Davis as they bring the scriptures to life and make known the Divine through their different gifts and graces.

Mullen sings of God’s transcendence—the One who both “spins things in orbit” and walks among the “weary, worn, and weak.”
 

Davis describes the intimate relationship between God and Abraham.

 

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New Models of the Church in a New Media World

In his seminal 1974 book Models of the Church, theologian Avery Dulles offered five paradigms, or "models," each of which called attention to certain aspects of the worldwide Christian church. The church, Dulles wrote, is in essence a mystery -- a reality of which we cannot speak directly. Thus we must draw on analogies to understand the church in deeper ways.

Dulles developed five models, drawing on a range of theological schools and traditions, both Protestant and Catholic, to illuminate different aspects of the church. His models included church as institution, mystical communion, sacrament, herald, and servant. Dulles was careful to point out that no single model, by itself, adequately paints a complete picture of the church; each contains important insights about the nature of the church.

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