Anne Marie Roderick

Editorial Assistant

In his book, Acts of Faith, Eboo Patel writes, “My struggle to understand the traditions I belong to as mutually enriching rather than mutually exclusive is the story of a generation of young people standing at the crossroads of inheritance and discovery, trying to look both ways at once.”

Anne Marie joins Sojourners at a similar crossroads. After graduating from Earlham College with a BA in Religion, she is eager to continue evaluating and envisioning what it means to be a Christian, a peacemaker, and a young adult in the world today. She looks forward to a rich year of discipleship and intentional community living.

In her free time, Anne Marie can be found practicing yoga, studying Hebrew, writing, baking cookies, and watching episodes of 30 Rock on Netflix (Tina Fey is so brilliant!).

Posts By This Author

'Relevance' Is Not Enough

Many young adults are leaving the church these days. Two 20-somethings reflect on what keeps them in the pews.

Four Questions for Kelvin Hazangwi

by Anne Marie Roderick 11-27-2012

Kelvin Hazangwi

Kelvin Hazangwi, executive director, Padare/Enkundleni Men's Forum on Gender in Harare, Zimbabwe

Two Reasons I'm Not A 'None'

by Anne Marie Roderick 10-22-2012
Anne Marie Roderick

Anne Marie Roderick

Editor's Note: Anne Marie Roderick tells her story of why she's NOT part of the 20 percent of Americans who identify with "no religion in particular." Find more stories (or share your own) HERE. Read about the study HERE.

It’s not surprising that a third of my peers say they are religiously unaffiliated. Our religious lives are too complex these days to fit in neat boxes with one-word labels.  I may be a “Christian,” but does that mean that I am like other Christians? Not necessarily.

There is sometimes more truth in being a “none” — in stating what we are not — rather than trying to pin down exactly what we are. But, I choose to affiliate anyway. Here’s why I am not a “none:"

Six Questions for Leila Sansour

by Anne Marie Roderick 10-03-2012

Leila Sansour, Catholic Palestinian film director and founder of the nonprofit Open Bethlehem

Murals and a Great Divide

by Anne Marie Roderick 08-01-2012

Documentary: "Concrete, Steel, and Paint"

Concrete, Steel, and Paint, directed by Cindy Burstein and Tony Heriza

'Croon Her to Sleep with Freedom Songs'

by Anne Marie Roderick 07-01-2012

The goal of social justice parenting is not to produce the "right" kind of child—it is to create an environment in which love flourishes.

Beer & Hymns: Imagining Christianity

Wild Goosers worship in the "Beer & Hymns" tent Saturday. Photo by Cathleen Falsani/Sojourners.

As we attended workshops and concerts, met new people, and tried to make sense of the larger impact this gathering might have beyond us, we kept coming back to that statement we heard early on about Walter Wink. What is Christian imagination? How do we imagine Christianity? Whatever it means, imagining Christianity is exactly what happened at Wild Goose.

Here's an example: Throughout the weekend, Fullsteam, a craft brewery in nearby Durham owned by an alumnus of Wheaton College (yes, that Wheaton) sold selling beer to quench the thirst of Goosers during late night sessions and performances (a la Homebrewed Christianity, etc.). And on Saturday afternoon — call it an early evening happy hour — a group of rag-tag musicians, armed with a few folk instruments, a trumpet and percussion, led a jolly crowd of more than 100 in Sunday School choruses and old-timey spirituals. They called it, “Beer and Hymns."

There, caught up in a holy wind of hops and hope, we reimagined what church might be during an ad hoc version of “He’s got the Whole World in His Hands.” We the motley worshippers alternated “He’s got the whole world” with “She’s got the whole world,” proudly singing at the top of our lungs, “She’s got the liberals and conservatives / the gays and straights / and a big ole mug of beer/ in her hands.”

Four Questions for Rev. Gerald L. Durley

by Anne Marie Roderick 06-01-2012

Rev. Gerald L. Durley, Pastor of Providence Missionary Baptist Church in Atlanta, Gerogia.

Mother's Week: Undervaluing Women

by Anne Marie Roderick 05-09-2012

There is a beautiful story that some Christians have learned to tell about motherhood. This story is one of strength, faith, sacrifice, loss, and unconditional love. 

Our Biblical mothers, from Eve to Mary and everyone in between (Sarah, Leah, Rachel, Jochebed (the mother of Moses), Bathsheba, Hannah, and Elizabeth to name a few) provide examples of women who defied societal constraints to protect their children; who gave them up so that their children might prosper; who supported, loved and nurtured their sons absolutely, without the expectation that that same love would be returned to them. 

In Mary’s story we are called to appreciate the mother who shepherded truth and salvation into the world, whose faith made our faith possible today. The Christian story of motherhood is one I am proud to tell and one I hope to live into one day. 

On Mother’s Day, we have the opportunity to reflect on the gifts of motherhood, to lift up the mother’s among us and recognize their strengths, sacrifices, and wisdom--what a beautiful idea. But the problem, in our society, is that one day of cards and flowers just doesn’t cut it. For most of the other 364 days of the year, the lives of women and mothers are undervalued. 

Anders Behring Breivik and Muslim-Christian Relations

by Anne Marie Roderick 04-18-2012

Anders Behring Breivik places a clenched fist on his heart as he arrives in central court in Oslo. ODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images

I opened up the NY Times homepage yesterday to find this headline: On Witness Stand, Norwegian Says He Would Kill AgainRemember this guy?  The Times says authorities have described Anders Behring Breivik as a “fundamentalist Christian…obsessed with what he saw as the threat of multiculturalism and Muslim immigration to the cultural and patriotic values of his country.” 

He killed 77 people, including 68 teenagers, in Norway last summer. 

Although Breivik admits to the murders, he doesn’t believe he should be held criminally accountable—he believes his actions were preventive measures, or, “self-defense.”