affordable health care

On Scripture: Studying the Law As We Study The Word (2 Timothy 2:8-15)

Medicine illustration, violetkaipa / Shutterstock.com
Medicine illustration, violetkaipa / Shutterstock.com

As people of faith, we sometimes don’t take time to prepare ourselves for what is ahead. With so many things vying for our time and attention, it is difficult to educate ourselves about all facets of critical matters. Even in our relationship with God, we gloss over important details that will guide us into a closer walk and become content with a distant half-hearted relationship. However, a casual walk with God is not one we should settle for. By delving into God’s Word, we are able to draw upon God’s wisdom for guidance and find a deeper relationship with God as we travel through this journey of life.

In a similar fashion, we cannot settle for casual knowledge of the Affordable Care Act, which is now upon us and “gives Americans unprecedented information about the health plan choices in their own communities.” The Kaiser Family Foundation reports in a recent poll that 51 percent of all Americans are still unsure about how the ACA will affect them. 42 percent of Americans thought that Congress had overturned the act or that the Supreme Court had ruled it unconstitutional. And, many Americans worry that they will have to shell out more money due to the new health reform law. This uneasiness and misinformation certainly warrants a closer look as we journey through the multiple avenues of the Affordable Care Act.

 

Supply and Demand?

Regarding Elizabeth Palmberg's article on healthcare costs ("Sky High and Rising," June 2011): I've been under the impression that a lot of our high medical costs are related to the restricted number of doctors. Aren't there many more students wanting to get into medical school than are accepted? What if we increased the number of medical schools and graduated twice as many doctors -- wouldn't the market drive down what doctors could charge for their services? Would that have to mean lowering standards for doctors? I understand the high cost of a medical education and would favor subsidizing the cost in exchange for lower costs for doctors' services.

Isn't much of the research for new drugs done at government expense at the National Institutes of Health? Then drug companies take promising ideas to testing and production: another example of privatizing the profits and socializing the costs. I like the idea of eliminating exclusive patents on medicines.                                     

Duane Beachey
Whitesburg, Kentucky

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