harriet tubman

Image via RNS/John Sonderman/Flickr Creative Commons

The National Museum of African American History and Culture, set to open Sept. 24, tells many stories of African-Americans of diverse faiths who have shaped U.S. history. Close to 10 percent of the 2,586 artifacts in its inaugural exhibitions are related to faith and religious history.

Rex Ellis, associate director for curatorial affairs, said the museum is essentially an intersection of uplift, spirituality and resilience.

“There is no way you can discuss, talk about or understand the African-American journey without understanding the very real role faith played in its history,” said Ellis, an ordained Baptist minister.

Putting Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill isn’t going to fix any of this. But I find it hard to not be excited that a strong black woman is being honored for being a strong black woman. Is a $20 bill an imperfect vehicle for this recognition? Yes. But I’m encouraged by the fact that the U.S. at least wants to appear as if celebrating black people is a normal thing to do.

the Web Editors 4-20-2016

Image via  / Shutterstock.com

Goodbye Andrew Jackson, and hello Harriet Tubman!

Secretary of the Treasury Jack Lew is expected to announce April 20 that Tubman, the iconic Underground Railroad conductor, Civil War armed scout, and woman’s suffragist Harriet Tubman will replace President Jackson on the $20 bill, reports Politico.

Diana L. Hayes 8-01-2012

Forged in the Fiery Furnace: African American Spirituality by Diana L. Hayes

Trevor Barton 6-12-2012
Ryan Rodrick Beiler / Shutterstock.com

Photo: White House march for immigration reform in 2009. Ryan Rodrick Beiler / Shutterstock.com

My second grader helped me understand that the story of Harriet Tubman is still being lived out today in the lives of Latino families in my school and across the country.

Mary Bauer and Sarah Reynolds authored the report “Under Siege: Life for Low-Income Latinos in the South for the Southern Poverty Law Center.”

They explain, "Latinos in the South—many of whom came here to escape crushing poverty in their home countries—are encountering wide-spread hostility, discrimination and exploitation."

This report helps us understand the struggle for life that many of our Latino students take on, a clandestine struggle like the one Harriet Tubman made all those years ago.

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