pets

Man Behind ‘Rapture Pets’ Rescue Admits it’s a Hoax

Girl with Golden Retriever photo, Martin Valigursky, Shutterstock.com

Girl with Golden Retriever photo, Martin Valigursky, Shutterstock.com

The owner of a business who claimed he would provide atheist rescuers for Christians' pets left behind in the Rapture now says his service was an elaborate hoax and never had any clients.

Bart Centre, who lives in New Hampshire, came clean after the state Insurance Department delivered a subpoena because he appeared to be engaged in "unauthorized business of insurance" through his Eternal Earth-Bound Pets business.

"Eternal Earth-Bound Pets employs no paid rescuers," Bart Centre wrote in a blog post on March 16. "It has no clients. It has never issued a service certificate. It has accepted no service contract applications nor received any payments -- not a single dollar -- in the almost three years of its existence."

Rapture Pet Rescue Business Wishes Harold Camping Would Keep Predicting

Owners with their dogs attend a blessing of pets and animals.(Photo by Marco Sec

Owners with their dogs attend a blessing of pets and animals.(Photo by Marco Secchi/Getty Images)

When doomsday prophet Harold Camping conceded last week that his failed May 21 end-of-the-world prediction was "incorrect and sinful," the average American probably shrugged, perhaps even snickered.

But for Bart Centre, Camping's mea culpa could have real impact on his bottom line.

The co-owner of a business that promises to care for the pets of Christians who are swept up in the Rapture saw a jump in business last year ahead of Camping's prediction.

Now he's sorry to see Camping get out of the predictions business.

 

 

"It was obviously a mistake," said Centre, who runs Eternal Earth-Bound Pets from New Hampshire. "I'm just sorry that he's not going to be doing any more predictions because it's good for business."

 

 

 

 

 

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