katharine hayhoe

A Problem with the Climate in Texas

Via tristan tan / Shutterstock

Close up of plastic and polystyrene fast food packaging in a river. Via tristan tan / Shutterstock

In the Hebrew and Christian scriptures, there is a Psalm that proclaims: “the earth is the Lord’s and everything in it, the world, and all who live in it” (Psalm 24:1). There is no part of this world that God is not aware of, cannot lay claim to, and does not rule. Christians affirm that as people of faith we’re called to be stewards over creation, answering one day for how we’ve treated the earth.

And part of that stewardship means understanding how this world works and what it needs in order to thrive. Unfortunately the din of our political ideologies has too often drowned out the biblical calling to care for creation.

In Texas, the State Board of Education will recommend new textbooks for all its students—and because it has such a large population, what they decide could determine what students in other states learn about science. There are several ideologues submitting textbook critiques to the board and their reviews will factor into each book’s overall score and likelihood of being approved by the school board. These ideologues could block the use of textbooks that teach the reality of climate change for the whole country’s public school students.

Calling for Change (Literally!)

Creation care, violetkaipa / Shutterstock.com

Creation care, violetkaipa / Shutterstock.com

What is a climate orphan? Why is the term “fossil fuels” misleading? What do knives have to do with air pollution and valuing our children? How can addressing climate change be 100 percent compatible with Christian values? Why should we care?

These questions and many others were part of a national conference call on creation care and climate change recently hosted by Sojourners. A handful of our nation’s leading creation care voices came together to discuss how they answer tough questions and effectively communicate their faith and commitment to climate justice.

The speakers included:

Rev. Mitch Hescox, President & CEO of the Evangelical Environmental Network; contributor, Sacred Acts: How Churches are working together to Protect Earth’s Climate.

Rev. Sarah Scherschligt, Associate Pastor, Prince of Peace Lutheran Church, Gaithersburg, MD; author, http://thebarefootpastor.blogspot.com/; Founder and leader of the Creation Care Team for the Metropolitan Washington DC Synod of the Lutheran Church (ELCA).

Katharine Hayhoe, Director of Climate Science Center and Associate Professor at Texas Tech University; co-author, A Climate for Change: Global Warming Facts for Faith-Based Decisions.

Calvin B. DeWitt, Professor, Gaylord Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, University of Wisconsin – Madison; author, Earthwise and Song of a Scientist: The Harmony of God-Soaked Creation

Listen to their presentations.