Tobias Winright

Tobias Winwright

Tobias Winwright

Tobias Winright is a contributing writer for Sojourners, and he holds the Maeder Chair in Health Care Ethics and is teaches theological ethics at Saint Louis University in St. Louis, MO. 

Posts By This Author

I Was John Howard Yoder's Graduate Assistant. Should I Still Use His Work?

by Tobias Winright 10-23-2015

Image via /

For me, the question of what to do with Yoder is not only an academic issue but a personal one. I was Yoder’s graduate assistant — and would be his next-to-last — for two years. Academically, how I teach my “War and Peace in the Christian Tradition” course is indebted in great extent to what I learned from him. As evident in numerous footnotes, my scholarship and publications, including for Sojourners, over the last two decades on just war and just policing also owe a lot to both his research and his mentoring.

Nevertheless, after this semester, I am leaning towards Blanton’s recommendation of setting Yoder’s work aside, at least for the foreseeable future. I think it is now possible to rely on the work of others for persuasive defenses of nonviolence and for strong critiques of Niebuhrian realism. I struggled over whether to use one of his books or essays in my course this semester. I hesitated to say anything about Yoder’s misconduct to my students. It took me a while before I did so.

What to do with Yoder? I’m not sure.

The U.S. Is Ignoring Pope Francis' Call to Abolish the Death Penalty

by Tobias Winright 09-29-2015

Screenshot via C-SPAN / Youtube

I formerly served as a corrections officer at a maximum security facility. I also used to be a reserve police officer. I have sped through city streets in a squad car, sirens blaring, on my way to shootings. I have booked and interviewed (interrogated) alleged murderers. I have seen victims’ families cry. I have had inmates hit me. I even used force when I wore a badge. And yet, as a Catholic Christian, over the years I have come to oppose capital punishment for a number of reasons.

I agree with Pope Francis’ remarks about the death penalty. During his speech before Congress, Democrats and Republicans applauded when he emphasized: “Let us remember the Golden Rule: ‘Do unto others as you would have them do unto you’” (Mt 7:12). The pope added: “This Rule points us in a clear direction. Let us treat others with the same passion and compassion with which we want to be treated. Let us seek for others the same possibilities which we seek for ourselves. Let us help others to grow, as we would like to be helped ourselves. In a word, if we want security, let us give security; if we want life, let us give life; if we want opportunities, let us provide opportunities. The yardstick we use for others will be the yardstick which time will use for us. The Golden Rule also reminds us of our responsibility to protect and defend human life at every stage of its development.”

A Matter of Degrees

by Tobias Winright 05-07-2015

Two underserved populations are earning college degrees in prison these days. Only one of them is incarcerated. 

'Demilitarize the Police!'

by Tobias Winright 11-05-2014

Across the country, police departments act more like an occupying army than keepers of the peace. 

Faith and the Executioner

by Tobias Winright 11-05-2013

Where Justice and Mercy Meet: Catholic Opposition to the Death Penalty. Liturgical Press.

Getting to Green

by Tobias Winright 01-08-2013

Sacred Acts: How Churches are Working to Protect Earth's Climate. New Society.

Gandalf, Gollum, and the Death Penalty

by Tobias Winright 11-27-2012

Theological considerations should frame the Christian response to capital punishment.

Abrahamic Faiths on Peace

by Tobias Winright 11-02-2012

Interfaith Just Peacemaking: Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Perspectives on the New Paradigm of Peace and War. Palgrave Macmillan.

Keeping the Peace

by Tobias Winright 12-01-2008

Crime and Sacrifice

by Tobias Winright 04-01-2007
What does the cross tell us about the ethics of capital punishment?