Amar D. Peterman is director of the Ideos Center for Empathy in Christian and Public Life. His writing has been featured in Christianity Today, the Berkley Center Forum, Faithfully Magazine, the Anxious Bench, and more. Follow him on Twitter: @amarpeterman.

Posts By This Author

The Great American Potluck

by Amar D. Peterman 10-11-2021

As Christians, I believe we must reject the project of the melting pot. In the Bible, the church is not portrayed as an ambiguous, homogeneous entity. Instead, difference and diversity are understood as a strength — as God’s gift to the church (Acts 2).

God of Our Mold and Decay

by Amar D. Peterman 10-01-2021

When we do not take care of the earth and allow powerful individuals or companies to plunder the land God has called good (Genesis 1), the people who are disproportionately impacted are the marginalized. This discrepancy between those who benefit and those who suffer highlights the way our society is structured to benefit oppressors at the expense of people who are poor, hungry, and disenfranchised.

There’s No Such Thing as a Colorblind Christianity

by Amar D. Peterman 08-17-2021

In our pursuit of justice, we must learn from projects like CRT which can illuminate the realities of multiracial communities in which the church ministers. To deny these realities or reject tools that help us perceive correctly, is to dishonor the call to neighbor-love and hospitality we have received.

Navigating a White Evangelical World In This Brown, Indian Body

by Amar D. Peterman 06-16-2021

By Green angel | via Shutterstock

This work of crafting a new narrative for Asian America takes various forms across many locations. It is not linear or systematic, but rather involves the relational work of changing a collective imagination of Asian Americans through both education and experience. Like any story, asserting a new narrative for Asian America requires engaging mind, body, and soul.

A Dark Kid in a Sea of Whiteness

by Amar D. Peterman 07-09-2020

Living an embodied faith asserts meaning upon our bodies both as individuals, and in relationship to one another. This means that the places our non-white bodies inhabit tell a story in itself, just as God enfleshed “entered our lives, calling us from the tomb in which society has sought to confine us.” The shared space of believers living out the Christian faith in diverse, multi-ethnic communities is a witness to our world of the power of Jesus Christ.