Liz Mosbo VerHage

Rev. Liz Mosbo VerHage, Ph.D., is an ordained pastor, professor, preacher, teacher, author, practicing theologian, wife and mom. She is the Pastor of Global and Local Ministries at Quest Church in Seattle, equipping the church to engage in presence, justice, advocacy, and compassion, and is an adjunct teacher for the Urban Ministry M.Div. and D.Min. program at North Park Theological Seminary in Chicago.

Posts By This Author

Worship Is Always Political

by Liz Mosbo VerHage 03-01-2016

Image via /Shutterstock.com

This world is messy, earthly, full of ugly and beautiful humanity competing with and loving each other, troubled by suffering and overrun with brilliant possibility, home of never-ending CNN coverage and sometimes terrible tweets. This world is our world, it is our Father’s world, and we are invited to take part in the redemptive Kingdom work of God in this world, this mess, now. When we are present in political conversations and advocacy, when we dare to hope and learn and speak up and engage, we are witnessing to our faith. We are helping steward the powers of this world — not for our glory or voting record or budget, but for the glory of the King of all Kings, and the Lord of all Lords. Thy Kingdom come, Thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Amen.

We Are One Body: White Christians, Time to Get in the Game

by Liz Mosbo VerHage 06-18-2015
Anita Patterson Peppers / Shutterstock.com

Anita Patterson Peppers / Shutterstock.com

I am grieving and lamenting and beyond angry over what feels like open season on the black community/church right now in the U.S. White Christians, this is the time to pay attention and be part of our nation’s struggle to understand and address the continual violence happening against our black sisters and brothers. When one part of the Body hurts we all hurt. When one part of the Body is repeatedly targeted, killed, not protected, pulled out of swimming pools, seen as threats when unarmed – and then misrepresented, silenced, or made small through ahistoric excuses, side-stepping through political mess, or any other form of evil – we need to stand up. We need to show up – loudly. We need to demand a different response – and start with our people in the church.

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