Rev. Laura Barclay

Rev. Laura Barclay is an author, consultant, and minister. She previously served the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship of North Carolina for five years as the Social Ministries Coordinator. She is now working on a book that will be released by Smyth & Helwys in Spring 2014, titled With Us in the Wilderness: Finding God’s Story in Our Lives. She resides in Louisville, Ky., with her spouse, Rev. Ryan Eller. If you are interested in having her speak or consult on spirituality, social justice or communications issues at your congregation, email her at rev.laurabarclay@gmail.com

Posts By This Author

No, Megyn Kelly, Jesus and Santa Weren't White

by Rev. Laura Barclay 12-17-2013
Travis S./Flickr/Creative Commons

In 2002, Popular Mechanics magazine featured an article, “The Real Face of Jesus.”

Conservative talk show host Megyn Kelly claimed on her Fox News show last week that “For all you kids watching at home, Santa just is white ... just because it makes you feel uncomfortable doesn’t mean it has to change, you know, I mean, Jesus was a white man, too ... that’s a verifiable fact, I just want kids to know that.”

This statement was in response to a Slate piece by Aisha Harris, “Santa Should Not Be a White Man Anymore,” which notes her confusion between seeing a black Santa figurine in her home while white Santas were popularized elsewhere at the mall and her school. Because the real history of St. Nicholas is so far removed from his present iteration as Santa Claus, she argues that it would be easier and less culturally problematic to change him into a penguin. This avoids questions of race and culture and makes him accessible to all. While I see her point about wanting to avoid cultural problems, it might be a good idea to confront the underlying issue of racism in America rather than continue to ignore it.

Heartbreak and Hope in Miami

by Rev. Laura Barclay 11-26-2013
Flickr Photo by Tiffany L. Clark/Creative Commons

Jose Antonio Vargas Flickr Photo by Tiffany L. Clark/Creative Commons

Last week, I attended a screening of Documented, Jose Antonio Vargas’ film about his coming out as an undocumented immigrant after winning the Pulitzer Prize. His journey is honest, poignant, and humorous. A lesser subject would have cut some of the material showing the strain of the situation on his familial relations, but the film never flinches from the raw story.

I sat in on a panel discussion after the screening filled with members of an organization featured in the film, “DREAMers Moms.” I had a chance to speak with several of them, and one story stuck out in particular. One mom left her country for the good of her children so they would have hope of a positive future in the United States. She hasn’t seen her mother in 13 years and won’t until immigration reform is passed into law. If she leaves the U.S., it’s likely she wouldn’t be allowed to return and care for her children. This would leave them essentially orphans who would be placed into foster care. Her mother is now in her 80s, frail and sick. This woman is losing hope of ever again touching the woman who cared for her, but still prays daily for a miracle.

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