Kevin Sakaguchi

Executive Assistant

Kevin Sakaguchi is the executive assistant for Sojourners. In this role, he reinforces the executive team in various aspects of logistics, management support, and operational efficiency.

Kevin graduated from Cedarville University with degrees in international studies and Spanish. He focused his studies on Latin America and Western Europe, culminating in an unforgettable study abroad semester in Valencia, Spain.

Through his work during college and post-graduation, Kevin has accrued comprehensive experience in event planning. Most recently, he worked intermittently for his alma mater's alumni department in both office management and assisting in the coordination of various alumni events across the nation. Previously, Kevin served in the guest services department to organize and execute large-scale events for the Board of Trustees and for prospective students. Finally, Kevin channeled his passion for social justice by leading an International Justice Mission chapter, coordinating major fundraisers, student advocacy campaigns, and local congressional lobbying. His position at Sojourners is the perfect combination for his skills, experience, and passion.

A native of Colorado, Kevin loves the outdoors, tennis, and nature. He is a coffee aficionado, amateur-foodie, and music enthusiast. Hopeful and optimistic, Kevin continues to dream of better tomorrow.

Posts By This Author

Eating Greens to Keep the Earth Green

by Kevin Sakaguchi 04-21-2014

An example of a meatless meal prepared by Sojourners staff. Photo: Ben Sutter/Sojourners

One of the best things about food and cooking is sharing. From devouring cheap local eats with best friends to inviting people over for dinner or hosting a full on party, food brings people together.

This week is Earth Week and as an intern community we are choosing to make concerted efforts to be greener in our choices to promote healthy bodies and ecosystems. This is the motivation behind Meatless Mondays. This global movement asks for restaurants, organizations, and individuals to go veggie on Mondays, being mindful of how our eating habits affect the globe.

Learning to Surrender

by Kevin Sakaguchi 01-14-2014
Kjetil Kolbjornsrud/Shutterstock

we need to let go of what we are trying to control and reach for God with open hands. Kjetil Kolbjornsrud/Shutterstock

It was my junior year of college. I sat in the balcony of chapel listening to a message and expecting nothing more than the usual chapel routine.

My life up until that point had been all about finding control and self-worth, which centered on academics and hard work. Blame my culture or my textbook Type A work patterns, but really the core of the issue was my pride and self-reliance. I wanted (and probably in some ways still want) to control and perfect every aspect of my life. X plus Y equals Z, right? 

So, I sat there completely unaware that it would be a message that I still haven’t forgotten. 

Breaking Down Walls and Individualism

by Kevin Sakaguchi 12-10-2013


While sitting listening to a musician pour out her heart through music at a show the intern house hosted, I was challenged. The emotions in her voice communicated her story and as I sat there pleasantly soaking in the music and admiring her vulnerability, I also realized I wouldn’t want to put myself out there like that. At that same moment, I stopped and thought, is that how I view church? Do I put up those same walls with God?

Vulnerability is difficult, when our culture thrives on individualism. Television shows, books, and movies tell us that we can create the world we desire through our own strength. This culture tells us that we are the creators of our reality, a societal standard that has seeped into the church, creating a standard of self-reliance and individualism.

Brennan Manning stated, “the church is not a museum for saints but a hospital for sinners.” The church “hospital” should be the place where we come ready for healing and treatment. As such, people generally do not go to a hospital hiding their wounds and disease expecting to get better. This self-medication can only cover the symptoms while never combating the true source of the ailment. The truth is that in life, we are all terminally ill patients with different pains in desperate need of a doctor. In this, we are not alone in the fight.


Representing Christ in the Face of Stereotypes

by Kevin Sakaguchi 10-29-2013

Sombre Model Looking Away. Courtesty Claire McAdams, via Shutterstock

On Oct. 13, Asian Americans United published an open letter asking the church to reevaluate its behavior toward its Asian brothers and sisters. The letter demands that the evangelical community listen and respect a community that has generally been overlooked or disregarded. Central to this issue is identity.

When we begin to divide or alienate communities through our behavior based on race, we are additionally dividing the identity of Christ. However, if we return to the core of what being Christian entails, we are reminded that we are not our own and find a new calling to community. 

With whom do you identify? In a nation, with over 75 percent of its population nominally claiming the label Christian, asking whom we identify with is an important question. It is a challenge but a daily necessity to reflect on our character and ask if we are truly representing Christ.