Kent Annan

Kent Annan is a senior fellow at Wheaton College’s Humanitarian Disaster Institute and is author of the forthcoming book, You Welcomed Me: Loving Refugees and Immigrants Because God First Loved Us (InterVarsity Press, 2019).

Posts By This Author

Video: Saved from the Rubble in Haiti

by Kent Annan 02-17-2010
Here is an interesting interview with Gerald and Wenson, who helped to rescue Christa Brelsford after a house in Darbonne collapsed on her during the earthquake.

Video: My Adopted Family Reunion in Haiti

by Kent Annan 01-25-2010
I was just interviewed on "100 Huntley Street," a national TV show in Canada. I was in Toronto for a Haiti Partners event with Tony Campolo on Sunday evening that was scheduled six months ago.

Haiti: 'How Long, Oh Lord, How Long?'

by Kent Annan 01-18-2010
My phone rang at 1:00 a.m. It was one of the young men in the family we lived with for the first seven months when my wife and I moved to Haiti.

On the Ground in Haiti

by Kent Annan 01-15-2010
Thank you so much for your concern, prayers, and gifts for people in Haiti. Here is a three-minute video from Haiti Partners co-director John Engle, who is in Port-au-Prince right now.

Christ and Whose Culture?

by Kent Annan 06-01-2009
A new wave of Native American evangelical theologians rejects the false choice between following Jesus or embracing their traditions.
Christopher Penler / Shutterstock

Christopher Penler / Shutterstock

SEVERAL HUNDRED PEOPLE stand on the grass waiting to enter the auditorium for the opening service of a Christian conference. People are holding bold, pre-printed signs (Teach for America, Evangelicals for Social Action, New York Theological Seminary) for the processional.

Meanwhile Richard Twiss has found a piece of scrap paper, because he doesn’t have a sign. He writes something with a ballpoint pen, then shows it to the four friends he’s standing with who are, like him, Native American evangelical theologians involved in ministry.

The others smile. The sign says: “Fighting Terrorism since 1492.”

It’s a cry for justice. It’s a serious reaction to the pain their communities continue to feel. It’s a reaction to all the other streams of “justice work” around them. It’s subversively funny. And it’s ballpoint pen on scrap paper, so it seems characteristic in another way: As they process in behind the sign over Twiss’ head, nobody in the auditorium can read what it says.

“It’s a problem of being heard,” says Randy Woodley, one of the theologians. “I feel like 500 years ago, maybe God did bring the white [people] over. But it was supposed to be something mutual, where we learned from each other. Instead the white [people] conquered, helped out by their understanding of Christianity. Five hundred years later, we ask ourselves, now are people ready to listen?”

Native American Theology(ies)

by Kent Annan 05-26-2009
"It's a problem of being heard," says Randy Woodley, a Native American theologian. "I feel like 500 years ago, maybe God did bring the white man over.

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