Kathryn Post

Editorial Assistant

Raised in a New Jersey suburb on the outskirts of Manhattan, I graduated from Calvin College in Grand Rapids, Michigan with degrees in political science and writing. Ever since first reading “The Letter from Birmingham Jail” in a high school history class, I’ve been fascinated by how Christians are called to respond to injustice. As a writer and religion editor for my college student paper, I covered issues such as gentrification in Grand Rapids, the college administration’s response to the termination of DACA, and student responses to #MeToo. I also spent a summer researching evangelical masculinity and the ways it can manifest in abuse. Most recently, I’ve been exploring the Church’s approach to racial justice, equity, and inclusion at a faith-based think tank in DC.

Though I love learning about topics related to faith, justice, and politics, I’ve struggled with how to put my research findings into action. For me, faith is distinctly political; I believe that the Gospel’s depiction of radical love has unavoidable implications for how Christians are called to live. One of the reasons I’m excited to be part of the Sojourners intern program this year is because of the opportunity to enact my convictions—not only will I be contributing to current conversations regarding faith/social justice as an editorial assistant, but I will also learn to live a life characterized by service and sacrifice alongside my fellow interns.

When I’m not reading books about social justice, you can usually find me running around the National Mall, exploring coffee shops, binge-watching The West Wing, or belting showtunes in the shower. Many thanks to my family for supporting my unpredictable life-decisions, and to my friends for giving me the courage to take the leap.

Posts By This Author

Beauty Resurrected from Brokenness

by Kathryn Post 01-24-2019
Out of tensions over difference, Mosaic Theater creates paths to communal renewal.

IN ITS MOST BASIC FORM, theater is about transformation: altering voices, mannerisms, appearances, and scenery until what was becomes unrecognizable. Theater is also about resurrection: an empty stage brought to life, an untold story come alive. And no theater better embodies resurrection than Mosaic Theater.

In fall 2014, the Edlavitch Jewish Community Center (JCC) of Washington, D.C., forced its theater company, Theater J, to cancel the critically acclaimed Voices of the Changing Middle East Festival due to pressure from JCC donors upset with the festival’s controversial nature. Ari Roth, Theater J’s artistic director, protested the end of the festival’s groundbreaking interfaith dialogue and was subsequently fired. Afterward, he established Mosaic Theater, of which he is the founding artistic director.

“In a way, it was a very dramatic, abrupt, and even violent birth,” Roth told Sojourners. “It involved collateral damage, harsh words, a firing, accusations of censorship, a divorce. There was a rupture.”

Mosaic Theater was born from broken relationship—yet today it stands as a testament to inclusion, reconciliation, and renewal. Located on H Street in D.C.’s Northeast quadrant, Mosaic is a thriving fusion community committed to producing high-quality, socially relevant art in an uncensored environment. It is now in the middle of its fourth season, titled “How Hope Happens.”

“Moving to Mosaic meant we would lose Judaism but keep the prophetic piece. It would be multifaith, a mosaic of faiths united by common values. And the top value was a belief in the power of art to transform and transport people and communities to new places,” said Roth.

Religious Freedom ... For All

by Kathryn Post 01-23-2019
It’s more than just a right-wing loophole for evading civil rights laws.

SINCE HOBBY LOBBY won its landmark case in 2014, the religious freedom narrative has been dominated by traditionalist, politically conservative Christians. But for most of our nation’s history, religious freedom was a bipartisan value that echoed a commitment to inclusive pluralism.

In 1993 and 2000, religious freedom laws were passed almost unanimously in Congress, with support from social progressives as well as conservatives. Religious freedom was viewed as a basic constitutional right that should be applied indiscriminately.

The 2016 election only exacerbated the perception of religious freedom as a conservative Christian value. President Trump vocally supported Jack Phillips, the baker of the Masterpiece Cakeshop case who refused to bake for a gay couple’s wedding because of his religious beliefs. Trump took steps to dismantle the Johnson Amendment, which protects nonprofits from partisan political manipulation and, with the signing of the first of his two executive orders on religious freedom, announced, “We are giving our churches their voices back.”

In some cases, conservatives are claiming their right to religious freedom in entirely appropriate ways. Yet, in too many cases, far-right Christians have used religious freedom as a loophole for discrimination or to evade civil rights laws. And secular progressives have allowed them to do it, ceding religious liberty to extremists and jeopardizing this core tenet of democracy.

But that narrative could be changing.

Escaping the Patriarchy

by Kathryn Post 12-28-2018
A review of ‘Women Talking,’ by Miriam Toews.

SEXUAL ABUSE is not about sex: It’s about power.

At least that’s what Ona, the female protagonist of Miriam Toews’ novel Women Talking, insists in the aftermath of one of the most horrifying incidents of sexual abuse in recent history. Toews’ book is based on true events: Between 2005 and 2009, more than 100 Mennonite women and girls in a remote community in Bolivia were raped at night by what they believed were demons punishing them for their sins. These attacks were perpetrated by men in the community who used modified animal anesthetics to drug and rape the women in their own homes. The victims’ ages ranged from 3 to 65.

Toews’ novel is a fictional account of a conversation between eight of these women. As Toews’ story develops, the rapists are imprisoned, other men of the community have gone to bail them out, and the women—illiterate and unaware of what lies beyond the boundaries of their community—gather to decide between three courses of action: do nothing, stay and fight, or leave. As they debate, their dialogue is infused with theological discussions and surprisingly dark humor. These conversations give insight into the community’s culture, religiosity, and the ways that each woman copes with her personal grief.

Oddly, the voice of August Epp, the meeting’s minutes taker and the only man present, dominates Toews’ narrative. This story about women resisting a patriarchy gives an unexpected amount of attention to a man.

Love Thy Airbnb Neighbor?

by Kathryn Post 10-25-2018
How Airbnb is Exacerbating the Affordable Housing Crisis
Photo by Breno Assis on Unsplash

Photo by Breno Assis on Unsplash

Airbnb — the company that ushered home-sharing into the mainstream — is facing backlash for exacerbating the affordable housing crisis in cities across the U.S. By booking weekend getaways through Airbnb and other home-sharing sites, travelers may be unknowingly and inadvertently worsening the crisis and supporting an industry that deprives locals of much needed long-term housing options.

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