Kaitlin Curtice

Kaitlin Curtice is a Native American Christian writer, speaker and worship leader. She is an author with Paraclete Press and writes at www.kaitlincurtice.com, on the intersection of culture and spirituality. 

Posts By This Author

A Prayer for Thanksgiving Week

by Kaitlin Curtice 11-21-2017

Sometimes we don’t know what to pray,
or how to talk to you about fixing what’s broken.
We pray in generalities, that you’ll
“be with us, guide us, restore us”
but sometimes, that’s not the tangible need
we really want to name.

Why Didn't We Hear About Jason Pero?

by Kaitlin Curtice 11-16-2017

The situation is complex, and there is not one answer. But it is the role of the church to listen to the oppressed. And when we cry out for justice, there should be an immediate response, toward Jason’s family and toward Native American tribes who have suffered for so long in America.

What if ‘Enough’ Really Meant Enough?

by Kaitlin Curtice 10-25-2017

Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) walks past journalists after announcing he will not run for reelection. Oct. 24, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
 

Yesterday, Republican Sen. Jeff Flake said in a statement, “Mister President, I rise today to say: enough.”

Enough.

I wonder what it might mean if we said that and really meant it.
As Christians.
As Americans.
As human beings.

When Will We Truly Celebrate Indigenous Peoples?

by Kaitlin Curtice 10-09-2017

Image via United Nations Photo/Flickr.

So we need to at least have the conversation, and for children who are home from school for the “holiday,” we should encourage families to talk honestly about what the history of Native peoples has looked like in the United States. We should be talking about what our history books are missing.

Tending to Our Spirits in Times of Tragedy

by Kaitlin Curtice 10-03-2017

When we return to each other, to the vitriol of the world and the work of peacemaking, may we return with the best of ourselves, with eyes to see and ears to hear, with clearer minds and clearer hearts whose voices are not drowned out by endless commentary.

May we return with the commentary of Christ to guide us and remind us of who we are called to be.

What If the World Ends on Saturday?

by Kaitlin Curtice 09-20-2017

Image via Simon & His Camera/Flickr

whether we listen to the numerologists who count the days until Armageddon or to the storms hurtling toward us and the daily violations of justice, it is healthy to remember that our days are, indeed, counted.

When We Hurt Our Neighbors, We Hurt Ourselves

by Kaitlin Curtice 09-08-2017

Enough of the church voted for a president that made such a decision among others, and those same churches, those same Christians, still uphold those decisions. As people who wish for a better America, we are called to remind one another that we belong to each other, no matter what race, religion, ethnicity, or sexual orientation.

A Prayer for the Cities Under Water

by Kaitlin Curtice 08-28-2017

People are rescued from flood waters from Hurricane Harvey on an air boat in Dickinson, Texas August 27, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
 

Jesus, when you walked on the water,

you beckoned Peter to come out of the boat, unafraid.

A Prayer for a Torn Nation

by Kaitlin Curtice 08-16-2017

Image via REUTERS/Justin Ide.

Somewhere completely outside of all of this,

you are ushering in a kingdom not of this world,

one that rights all wrongs and rules in love.

But for now, here we are.

The Theft of White Supremacy

by Kaitlin Curtice 08-14-2017

And our best chance at fighting supremacy on a daily basis is to know who we are, to know the truth of what we are called to be in the name of Jesus — based on his peace, his shalom, his justice, and based on the fact that all people are equally valuable in their own skin and own cultures. This forces us to take a look at our missionary ideologies, at the way we view light and darkness and what we teach from our pulpits and in our bible studies. It forces us to recognize that people who are outside the institutional church are doing the good work of Jesus, too, and we learn from them.

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