Jamar A. Boyd II

Jamar A. Boyd II is a first year seminarian at the Samuel DeWitt Proctor School of Theology at Virginia Union University, President of the Georgia NAACP Youth & College Division, and a licensed Minister in the Church of God in Christ. He has been featured in Abernathy Magazine

Posts By This Author

The Deadly Apathy of White America

by Jamar A. Boyd II 09-10-2018

America is still led by an apathetic majority void of compassion, empathy, and sympathy. A majority unable and unwilling to confess their biases, hate, phobia, and toxicity, making themselves apathetic to the reality of African Americans. From their perspective intentional and toxic discrimination, racism, and police practices is not their problem; they have no role in this plight and degradation.

America Still Doesn't Care About Black and Brown Bodies

by Jamar A. Boyd II 08-01-2018

Image via Shutterstock/ Lucas Maverick Greyson 

America’s allegiance is not to black and brown bodies. It is bound to prejudice, racism, militarism, and violence predominantly against people of color. And while Black Lives Matter rose as a voice and movement for black lives, the NAACP’s Youth & College Division amplified its voice, and black Americans across this nation cried out, the American majority kept quiet.

America Watches Black Pain. Then We Move On

by Jamar A. Boyd II 05-29-2018

Metro Davidson County Police inspect the scene of a fatal shooting at a WaffleHouse restaurant near Nashville, Tennessee, U.S., April 22, 2018. REUTERS/Harrison McClary. 

I mentioned these incidents not solely because I’m a black man in America, but because our attention is easily swayed away from these incidents. They are uncomfortable and authentic truths and possible realities for all minorities in America. They are most certainly the fear of most black youth, young adults, persons, and parents in this country. The possibility that you can/could be killed for being ‘Black in America’ is daunting.

The Sacred Space of the Mind

by Jamar A. Boyd II 04-10-2018

The sacred space of the mind in black men and women in 2018 must be reclaimed, reexamined, recalibrated, and reignited for the fight that is ours. 

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