Chris Chatelaine-Samsen

Chris Chatelaine-Samsen is a pastor in the PC(USA). He has a M.Div. from Princeton Theological Seminary, and worships with the Church of the Saviour community in Washington, D.C., an ecumenical network of church communities and non-profits.


Posts By This Author

Dear Church: Did We Forget to Say 'Sorry?'

by Chris Chatelaine-Samsen 06-01-2015
Image via nito/

Image via nito/

I have been in this conversation like many others, excited about a future of possibility. And yet it occurred to me that I forgot to do something in all of this panic and evaluation and re-visioning.

I forgot to say I’m sorry.

Why #NotAllMen Misses the Point

by Chris Chatelaine-Samsen 05-29-2014
Misogyny kills, by Jenna Pope at Unarmed Civilian /

Misogyny kills, by Jenna Pope at Unarmed Civilian /

To my fellow men,

I’m sure you are as heartbroken as I am about the killings at UC Santa Barbara by a troubled young man with a misogynistic manifesto. Heartbroken for the community, for the families who lost loved ones, and even for the young man who felt like there was no other way.

Now I’m not much of a “Tweeter” (is that the right word?), but I heard that a group of us has taken to defending ourselves on Twitter with the hashtag #NotAllMen. They want to say that that #NotAllMen sexually assault women. #NotAllMen expect a date to be reciprocated with sex. #NotAllMen harass women for the way they do or don’t look at us. They want to say that we’re not like those other people, that we respect women as equals, not demean them as prizes or products.

Who cares?

To the Dying Church: Do What You Came Here to Do

by Chris Chatelaine-Samsen 05-15-2014
Stained glass window & crucifix, benztsai /

Stained glass window & crucifix, benztsai /

To the dying church,

I think I missed the moment. It was a pretty big moment, too. At least here in the United States, you were a force to be reckoned with until a few years ago. You helped form the fabric of our society. Pastors were well-respected people of authority. They built great big sanctuaries, and people wore respectable clothing on Sunday mornings. To be fair, you didn’t — and don’t now — always live up to the hype. Sometimes you hide your head in the ground when it’s time to stand up against racism and homophobia. You’re still not so sure about the equality of women. You sometimes sell out to political agendas.

But regardless of the good and the bad, the moment is now over, and you’re dying. Or that’s what they tell me. All that power and influence is fading away. It sounds like some churches are having trouble even keeping the lights on. I know I should mourn for you, but allow me a moment of self-pity here too. What, you thought it was all about you?

You see, I’ve been getting ready for a few years now. A bunch of us have. Some of us have grown up with you, and some of us have just met you recently, but we’re all lining up to serve you. Somehow we all have this nagging sense that we’re supposed to be with you in these days, so some of us went to seminary and some went to college to learn youth ministry. We went to conferences and gave up our evenings and weekends to church basements with committees and youth groups. We read books and studied Scripture and prayed and imagined the kingdom of God breaking into the world through you. They call us emerging leaders, and we had a lot of hopes for you.