Christian Community Development

Meeting the Demands of a New Generation of Christian Leaders

Community concept, hollymolly /Shutterstock.com

Community concept, hollymolly /Shutterstock.com

The Christian Community Development Association (CCDA) has been a powerful force for Christian social action over the past decade. CCDA's leadership development, resources, and vision have been powerfully focused on helping pastors and community leaders facilitate the restoration of communities all over the country and around the world.

Born out of the traditions of the civil rights movement, CCDA is now engaging a new generation of pastors, prophets, and ministers. This next generation of CCDA will naturally look somewhat different from previous generations as they respond to the ever-changing landscape of our society. As it turns out, one major difference is a hunger among leaders for a more robust and powerful theological foundation from which to pursue ministry.

Practics has long dominated the field of Christian social action. What works? What strategies and techniques will actually bring about change in our community? These have been the central questions of past generations. However, among a new generation of church and community leaders, practical questions are not the sole concern, and in some cases not even the primary concern.

The Never-Ending Story

Photo: Hands clasped in prayer. Lincoln Rogers / Shutterstock.com

Photo: Hands clasped in prayer. Lincoln Rogers / Shutterstock.com

The evening was warm. Seated at the small desk by the windows I opened my Bible and started to read from Jeremiah, "Seek the welfare of the city to which I send you." The passage was also inscribed over the entrance to the cloisters of Richmond Hill, the old convent turned retreat center in the Church Hill neighborhood of Richmond, Va., overlooking downtown. I was on retreat and seeking a little inspiration.

Seek the welfare of the city, said Jeremiah. Pray for the city, say the people of Richmond Hill. Love the city. Work for the good of the city. This is the city of God. Every city is the Holy City.

The verse from Jeremiah actually continues on. It's a bit more involved than the brief passage inscribed over the entryway:

"But seek the welfare of the city
to which I have sent you into Exile,
and pray to the Lord on its behalf,
for in its welfare you will find your welfare." (Jer. 29:7)

Oh no ... I'm gonna have to work this out.

Love God, Love Your Neighbor: How Are We Doing?

Young man in subway photo, PashOK / Shutterstock.com

Young man in subway photo, PashOK / Shutterstock.com

For the Christian church it should be a constant question. This “greatest commandment” is given by Jesus in Matthew 22Mark 12Luke 10 and paraphrased here in John 13.

"A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another: just as I have loved you, you also are to love one another. By this all people will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another.”

So how are we doing? 

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