As We Have Been Given

In the fall of 1975, representatives from several U.S. communities met to explore the possibility of a new relationship between communities from diverse ecclesiastical traditions, which were coming to share similar conclusions about the church's mission in the world (see "A Community of Communities," Sojourners, January 1980). A year later, a number of these communities entered into an intentional relationship, and the Community of Communities was born. In February 1984 this network of communities agreed to the following statement. —The Editors

Introduction

A new wind is blowing throughout the churches, creating an awakening among Christians. The central vision and vocation of this awakening is the joining of faith and history, the incarnation of the gospel in our particular historical situation.

People from divergent traditions and histories are coming together in a movement of biblical faith and Christian conscience, offering a message of hope. Drawn together by the Spirit and the historical crisis we confront, we believe that the unity we have come to share is the work of the God of history, who has knit us together in love, fellowship, and a common vision of the gospel.

The old divisions are beginning to break down—divisions between spirituality and politics, pastoral and prophetic ministry, worship and action, prayer and peacemaking, evangelism and social action, biblical study and political analysis. In more and more places, the voice of the church is being raised in a cry for justice and peace. The political and economic establishments can no longer count on the silence of the church when their policies crush the poor, deny human rights, and threaten nuclear holocaust.

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