Principled Immigration Reform

Principled Immigration Reform

In the past decade, more than 2,000 people have died crossing the Mexican-U.S. border, according to the Tucson-based No More Deaths coalition. In an effort to decrease the number of deaths, the coalition has developed faith-based principles to guide immigration reform, which include demilitarizing the border patrol, legalizing residency for many migrant workers, and reunifying immigrant families. Forty-three Christian, Jewish, and Muslim clergy have endorsed the principles, which show how “people of faith share a common tradition of welcoming strangers and helping those in need,” Tucson’s Catholic Bishop Gerald Kicanas told Sojourners. “All faith starts with the dignity of each person and the right to live in dignity.”
The Secure America and Orderly Immigration Act of 2005 also addresses border policies. The act—introduced in both houses of Congress—aims to balance earned legalization for workers and unification of families with strict border control and international cooperation to stop illegal immigration.

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