The central religious issue in this election is racism. It’s also a referendum on our faith.

Any attempt by the president to single-handedly change the election date would be illegal and immoral.

So how do we honor John Lewis and C. T. Vivian in the midst of our history — right now?

Trump's push to reopen schools at all costs comes with collateral damage.

For decades, white political leaders in the U.S. have masked their racism, subtly stoking white voters’ racial fears. But now, the mask is off.

Symbols shape both memory and future.

It is moments like this that remind us that change is possible and motivate us to not settle for this partial fix.

What are white Christians willing to risk to secure safety, health, and equity for their brothers and sisters of color?

Whether our changing cultural consciousness will have a real effect remains to be seen.

Transforming our policing and reimagining public safety will require much more dialogue, bridge-building, and, ultimately, sustained public pressure.

Trump's inflammatory words and reckless actions only pour gasoline on the flames of anger and racial injustice.

While governors and mayors are trying to deescalate the nation’s unrest, the president is escalating the violence.

We must stop. We must weep. We must mourn. We must honor. And we must lament.

From police violence to coronavirus, who is America willing to protect?

We must protect our democracy and the image of God in each voter. 

Who is most likely to be sacrificed on the altar of economic prosperity and the president’s reelection campaign?

While each of us has borne a variety of new burdens and dangers during this pandemic, those burdens are by no means distributed equally.

These three biblical principals are essential tests for our nation's health and healing.

It’s critical that—even as we stand apart from each other for our physical health—we find new ways to stand together. 

Christ is risen, He is risen indeed.