Courtney Hall Lee

Courtney Hall Lee is a freelance writer and attorney. She co-hosts the "Dovetail" podcast, a show about the intersections of faith, culture, and social justice. Courtney is a graduate of Dartmouth College and earned her law degree from Case Western Reserve University. She is now pursuing graduate studies at Hartford Seminary.

Courtney's first book Black Madonna: a Womanist Look at Mary of Nazareth is forthcoming from Cascade Books. Courtney is a contributor at WomenInTheology.org and her work has appeared at RELEVANT. A northeastern girl adjusting to southern life in Charlotte, N.C., she lives with her husband, daughter, and toy poodle. You can find her on Twitter @courtrhapsody and at CourtneyHallLee.com.

Posts By This Author

Black Lives — Not Just Black Votes — Matter

by Courtney Hall Lee 03-04-2016

Image via /Shutterstock.com

Does it make sense for Hillary and Bernie to court the black vote? Absolutely. I am not troubled by their clamor to win our support. What is truly disheartening is that our support does not ensure racial progress. No one candidate should be held responsible for fixing America’s race problem. But what black voters want is a candidate who is brave enough to say that America has a serious race problem.

While both candidates have put some effort in to this message, for both candidates it was only after they faced protest by Black Lives Matter activists. It was only when the media asked them directly if Black Lives Matter that they answered in the affirmative. 

Beyoncé and the Next Great Awakening

by Courtney Hall Lee 02-14-2016

Rev. Michael Piazza is well known for developing Dallas’s Cathedral of Hope, the first predominantly LGBT church in the country. The Cathedral of Hope grew from a store-front church into a megachurch with a message of inclusivity, love, and justice. I am taking a class taught by Rev. Piazza this semester, and with us he recently shared a compelling insight. Rev. Piazza believes that America will have another Great Awakening. 

I think that the time for that awakening could be right now, and Beyoncé’s documentary does a stellar job of showing us why.

How the Flint Water Crisis Opened America’s Eyes to Environmental Injustice

by Courtney Hall Lee 01-27-2016
Flint, Mich., water tower.

Flint, Mich., water tower. Linda Parton / Shutterstock.com

America’s poor always bear the brunt of manmade ecological problems. Urban air pollution, dwelling near industrial facilities and their waste, and exposure to lead paint are a few of the ways that the poor are put at risk; they face more health problems caused by environmental factors than anyone else. Based on this, I ask this question: Should environmental justice be at the forefront of the church’s social justice ministries?

5 Ways Anyone Can Benefit from a Sober January

by Courtney Hall Lee 01-12-2016

One of the most famous miracles in the Bible was when Jesus turned water into wine at a wedding in Cana. When the wine at the party ran dry, at his mother’s request young Jesus made a lot of wine (and he made the good stuff). From the teetotling temperance movement to the sacramental nature of communion wine, alcohol and faith have an interesting relationship. But after a couple-month celebration of thanks, the birth of Christ, and the arrival of a new year, many observe this month as Sober January.

What Will It Take to End the Ban on Gun Violence Research?

by Courtney Hall Lee 12-22-2015

Image via Light Brigading/Flickr

Congress has repeatedly prevented government research of gun violence out of fear. Opponents of gun research fear what it will reveal — uncovering more information might convince more people that there are problems with American gun laws. By avoiding empirical study, it seems clear that we may already suspect the answers.

The Invisible Women of the Daniel Holtzclaw Trial

by Courtney Hall Lee 12-10-2015

Image via /Shutterstock.com

In matters of racism and sexism, even the revolutionaries come with their own biases. The narrative of Jesus and the Canaanite woman shows us the importance of intersectionality, and careful attention that must be paid to highly marginalized people. Jesus wore the glasses of justice, but found that even he came to a situation where he needed a stronger prescription.

 

'What Kind of God Are You?' Black Theodicy in Times of Tribulation

by Courtney Hall Lee 11-30-2015

Image via /Shutterstock.com

One of the most common criticisms of faith I have heard is this: if there is an all-powerful and loving God somewhere out there, why does this God allow horrible things to happen? In a world where there has always been war, sexual violence, starvation and murder, where is this omnipotent God? Why does he allow these things to happen? Where is she when people suffer injustice?

The Bible gives us plenty of examples of the abuses of the faithful, sometimes even at God's own hand (like in the book of Job). We read of the systemic oppression of the Jewish people and the early Christian church. Through this, God's people were always able to remain steadfast in their faith. Forming a defense of faith in God in the face of realized evil is known as theodicy.

So: In a nation where Blacks have been enslaved, lynched, and raped because of their race, and in time where people must declare that “black lives matter,” how do black Americans form their own theodicy to justify this violence, abuse, and systemic oppression?

And is it necessary to do so?

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