Commentary
By Lindsey Paris-Lopez 5-08-2017

Recently, 217 of you from the House of Representatives passed a bill that, if signed into law, effectively consigns untold numbers of people to a death sentence.

Any potential cost savings to the government comes at the expense of essential care to the vulnerable. The number of vulnerable people will expand dramatically when quality health care is reduced and denied. No potential savings from the American Health Care Act could ever begin to make up for the pain, suffering, death, broken families, and broken communities that the AHCA, if passed, will cost over time.

I am writing to all of you, members of the Senate, because before health care legislation is finalized, you will have to negotiate to reconcile your various constituencies. That means there is still time for the American people to make our demands, and we are crying out for you to hear us. The vast majority of us who stand to lose much-needed care are asking for more than the defeat of this dangerous bill. We are demanding that you work for us, the people — not the profits that may be gained by reducing our access to the care we need.

The American Health Care Act is a terrible bill that will cut Medicaid, roll back protections for pre-existing conditions, and price millions of people out of health coverage. But the Affordable Care Act also falls short of the goal of universal health care as 27 million people go uninsured. It may be a step in the right direction, but we need to keep moving forward.

I, like many, favor a single-payer health care system with high-quality coverage regardless of one’s ability to pay. But more than any particular health care system, I want representatives who exercise empathy and compassion when crafting legislation. This compassion is noticeably lacking in a health care bill aimed at reducing costs at the expense of essential care. It sends the message that money in the hands of the powerful few is the foundation of this country, not a healthy citizenry.

Without a healthy citizenry, we cannot be a healthy nation. While we need health care legislation that ensures access to medicine and treatment regardless of means, we need you to prioritize public health above private wealth in alllegislation. We need for you to take a truly comprehensive approach to ensuring and safeguarding this fundamental human right. This means we need for you to recognize the many factors that impact our health and design laws accordingly.

Pollution, poverty, and war take their toll on our health in ways beyond our control, and yet health care in our nation is still treated as a commodity for those who can afford it, rather than as a right for all. It is unthinkable that our nation can build pipelines that poison clean drinking water but expect citizens to suffer without affordable treatment due to lead exposure. It is unacceptable that some communities are trapped in cycles of poverty through discrimination often born of racism but cannot afford the medicine they need because their money must go to cheap, often less nutritious food. And while it is unconscionable that our nation spends more on destroying lives abroad than it does on saving lives at home, the damage from war exceeds mere monetary cost. Investing in fighting an enemy abroad fuels enmity and distrust at home, putting undo stress on us and eroding our sense of compassion.

In ignoring these factors beyond our control, the AHCA pays lip service to “personal responsibility” but ignores our interpersonal responsibility to each other. In fact, only a culture that has lost sense of the interconnection of all humanity could produce a bill as heartless as the American Health Care Act.

But I do not believe that any of you are truly heartless. I do believe that many of you have put partisan rivalry over the welfare of the people, seeking political victories by repealing so-called “Obamacare.” I think that partisanship and profit have brought out your inner demons of rivalry and greed and suppressed your better angels of compassion. I think you are all better than this bill, better than a budget that invests more in death than in life, better than leaving your sisters and brothers to die.

Jesus said, “You cannot serve God and money.” This also means you cannot serve the image bearers of God while trying to profit at their expense. You need not believe in God at all to recognize that you cannot serve your constituents while also denying the vulnerable the most basic care.

But if you do believe in God, and believe the first letter of John that defines God as love, then you must realize that the American Health Care Act does not serve love.

Please know that if you plan to vote in a manner that punishes the poor, the elderly, and the vulnerable, if you plan to justify spending billions on killing people overseas but not saving people at home, if you plan to pretend that health care should fall entirely within the realm of personal responsibility even though many health factors are outside a person’s control, then you will not receive my support.

When I vote against a heartless governing philosophy, I am not voting against you, but against the greed and rivalry that brings out the worst in you. But I trust that you can listen to the spirit of love inside of you that treasures people above profit. I trust that you can write and pass laws that fulfill your duty to promote the general welfare.

Lindsey Paris-Lopez is editor-in-chief at the Raven Foundation, where she uses mimetic theory to provide social commentary on religion, politics, and pop culture.

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"Dear Congress, the American Health Care Act Is Heartless "
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