Source: Time Magazine | Jim Wallis

We must resist the terrible teachings of Donald Trump

This week, as Christians mark the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus, we find ourselves traveling from the darkness of Good Friday into the light and joy of Easter Sunday.

Listen to the interview here.

Outspoken evangelical preacher Jim Wallis has been arrested many times at civil rights and anti-war protests over the years. In the wake of the deaths of Michael Brown, Eric Garner and Tamir Rice, he tells Andrew West it's time for America to confront its 'original sin'—racism.

Source: Springfield News-Leader | Cory Goode

Here’s my review of “America’s Original Sin: Racism, White Privilege, and the Bridge to a New America,” a new book by Jim Wallis: If you are a Christian, you should read this book.

Wallis, founder of Sojourners, a national faith-based organization that advocates for social justice, is a public theologian and the best-selling author of 12 books. He is white.

Rather than summarize his latest book, I am sharing some of my favorite passages. In Wallis’ own words:

Source: Washington Post | Jonathan Capehart

Ian Haney Lopez articulated like no one else has why Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) talking about race comes off as cold to my African-American ears. And his explanation highlighted for me not only how I believe Hillary Clinton gets it right, but also how discussions of race and “America’s Original Sin” of racism should be handled going forward.

The Denver areas's best-selling books, according to information from The Tattered Cover.

FICTION

1. All the Light We Cannot See, by Anthony Doerr

2. The Nightingale, by Kristin Hannah

3. Midnight Sun, by Jo Nesbo

4. The Widow, by Fiona Barton

5. Georgia, by Dawn Tripp

6. The Girl on the Train, by Paula Hawkins

7. S., by J. J. Abrams

8. Our Souls at Night, by Kent Haruf

9. My Name Is Lucy Barton, by Elizabeth Strout

Source: The Independent | Cole Moreton

How the hell can anyone who calls themselves a Christian vote for Donald Drumpf?

That’s the question that needs to be asked as this racist, misogynist hate-monger who supports torture, ridicules the disabled and wants to ban all Muslims from America, comes ever closer to winning the Republican nomination and, potentially, the White House.  

Listen to the full program here.

Source: WBUR (NPR) | Here and Now

Listen to the interview here.

The leader of the Christian social justice group Sojourners says the young black Americans who have been killed by police are victims of deep, structural racial sins that go back to the founding fathers.

Source: GetReligion | Richard Ostling

On Super Tuesday, Donald Trump easily swept the four states with the heaviest majorities of Protestants who consider themselves “evangelicals” – Tennessee, Alabama, Arkansas and Georgia.

So the campaign’s major religious puzzle – likely to be pondered come 2020 and 2024 – continues to be how to explain Trump’s appeal to Bible Belters.

“SOMETIMES I wonder,” said Doug Long, shivering among the demonstrators in Raleigh, North Carolina, on February 13th, “whether everyone who defines themselves as Christian really believes in the same God.” As a rabbi sharing the interfaith stage blew a shofer, and a protest group called the Raging Grannies denounced restrictions on voting rights, Mr Long, a pastor in the United Church of Christ, explained that, in his view, Jesus would have stood for racial and sexual equality.

Source: The Oregonian | Melissa Binder

While black churches have long led the charge against racism, the white Christian community has largely held back, says author Jim Wallis.

He's on a nationwide mission to change that, including in Portland.

Wallis's newest book, "America's Original Sin: Racism, White Privilege, and the Bridge to a New America," is an indictment of white Christian apathy and inaction towards systemic racism. We interviewed Wallis about the book last week. 

Watch video of the interview via PBS here. Listen to audio below.

Source: USA Today | Jim Wallis

Some white Americans would like to try to “fix” the systemic racism that exists in our criminal justice, educational, economic, and even our religious institutions. But in order for real change to occur, our understanding of realities like white privilege must also move beyond the institutional and into the very personal.