referendum

Victoria Mason 6-22-2016

Image via Rareclass/Flickr

I grew up in Northern Ireland. I lived through very little of “the Troubles,” in large part because of the huge efforts of those on both sides seeking peace. I remember the Good Friday Agreement in 1998, and experienced the stability of the years that followed. So my heart sinks when I think of leaving the EU — of the border controls we would build to stop freedom of movement through the U.K.’s only land border with an EU country, and of the smouldering tensions this would fan effortlessly into flame.I grew up in Northern Ireland. I lived through very little of “the Troubles,” in large part because of the huge efforts of those on both sides seeking peace. I remember the Good Friday Agreement in 1998, and experienced the stability of the years that followed. So my heart sinks when I think of leaving the EU — of the border controls we would build to stop freedom of movement through the U.K.’s only land border with an EU country, and of the smouldering tensions this would fan effortlessly into flame.

Kim Hjelmgaard 5-26-2015
Photo via REUTERS / Cathal McNaughton / RNS

A couple walks in Dublin as Ireland holds a referendum on gay marriage May 23, 2015.Photo via REUTERS / Cathal McNaughton / RNS

In many ways, Ireland remains a heavily Catholic country.

Yet the emphatic “Yes” vote to same-sex marriage rights on May 22 represents a seismic shift in the nation’s social liberalization and challenges the Roman Catholic Church to rethink its role in Irish society.

Photo via REUTERS / Cathal McNaughton / RNS

A poster supporting the Yes vote is displayed in Dublin on May 19, 2015. Photo via REUTERS / Cathal McNaughton / RNS

“In Ireland,” says a character in a 1904 George Bernard Shaw play, “the people is the Church, and the Church is the people.”

But not so much anymore.

On May 22, voters in this once deeply Roman Catholic country will decide whether the country’s constitution should be amended to allow for gay marriage. If the amendment passes, Ireland will become the first country to legalize same-sex civil marriage by popular vote.

Elizabeth Palmberg 1-03-2011
Murderous regime in Khartoum, meet "Google Earth on lots of steroids": It's time for your close-up.

[Editors' note: South Sudan is preparing for its independence referendum on January 9 -- an event whose occurrence is threatened by North Sudan's intransigence and by logistica
LaVonne Neff 12-02-2010
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[Editor's Note: Voter registration has now started for South Sudan's January 9 referendum on independence -- an event whose occurrence is threatened by North S
Beny Ngor Chol 11-08-2010
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Rev. Sam Kobia 11-05-2010
[Editor's Note: As Sudan prepares for the key January 9 referendum in which South Sudan will decide whether to become independent, as outlined by the 2005 agreement which ended
Elizabeth Palmberg 4-23-2010
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Celestin Musekura 4-15-2010
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Allison Moody 4-14-2010
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The people of Massachusetts already have near universal health care. Too many of the rest of us do not.
Jim Wallis 11-05-2009
Most of the country probably didn't notice.
Ryan Rodrick Beiler 11-03-2009

Thankfully, the crisis in Honduras may be reaching a political resolution.

Cynthia Lapp 10-16-2009
We are accustomed to standing outside the White House, protesting the policies of war and torture.
Ashley Morse 7-02-2009

On the morning of June 28, Honduran President Manuel "Mel" Zelaya was awoken suddenly as masked soldiers burst into his home. As the media has been rave to point out, still in his pajamas, the elected head of state was forced onto a plane and shipped out of the country.

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