Maria J. Stephan 08-31-2011

Recent analyses of the Arab Spring have questioned the efficacy of nonviolent resistance compared to armed struggle in ousting authoritarian regimes. The relatively expeditious victories of the nonviolent uprisings (not "revolutions," as some suggest) in Tunisia and Egypt stand in stark contrast to Libya, where a disparate amalgam of armed groups, guided politically by the Libyan Transitional National Council (TNC) and backed militarily by NATO, are on the verge of removing Moammar Gadhafi from power. As someone who has written extensively about civil resistance, notably in the Middle East, while at the same time working on the Libya portfolio within the State Department, I've been grappling with the meaning and significance of the Libyan revolution and its possible impact on the region.

First of all, like most people, including my State Department colleagues, as well as democrats and freedom fighters around the world, I am delighted that an especially odious and delusional Libyan dictator is getting the boot. I applaud the bravery and determination of the Libyan people, who have endured four decades of a despicable dictatorship and have made great sacrifices to arrive at this point. I hail the extensive planning that my U.S. government colleagues have undertaken over the past five months, in concert with Libyan and international partners, to support a post-Gadhafi transition process.

Jake Olzen 07-20-2011

After months of good-faith reforms and patience, the drama is back in Egypt's Tahrir Square as protesters are preparing for a potential showdown with the state's military rule. The movement, among other things, is demanding an end to military rule -- a more radical call that reflects both the frustration with the status quo and the hope for a better way.

Two weeks ago, at the "Day of Persistence," Egypt saw its largest resurgence of public protest since former President Hosni Mubarak was ousted in February. The nation-wide protests show Egyptians camping out in Cairo's Tahrir Square, staging sit-ins and blocking traffic in Alexandria, and threatening to shut down Suez's tunnel access to Sinai. So why are the people confronting -- albeit nonviolently -- an interim government that has promised elections and a new constitution? A glance at the collective demands drafted in Tahrir Square make clear that the movement's demands -- both political and economic -- have not progressed much under the military rule of the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces.

Bryan Farrell 06-08-2011
Atiaf Alwazir, who runs the blog Woman from Yemen, has a new post explaining the relationship between what she calls the "peaceful
Vanessa Ortiz 04-29-2011
Well, the last time I checked, women were in the front lines of civil resistance struggles in" target="_blank
Jim Wallis 03-22-2011
The U.S. just started another war. We're good at starting wars. We're not good at ending them, but we start them really well. They say this is for "humanitarian" reasons. Aren't they all?

Before last week, we'd rarely thought about unions or union rights, but living in Madison these days, it seems that we hardly make it through an hour without hearing the words "unions" and "collective bargaining." In the past week, we've tried to give ourselves a crash course on what e

Jim Wallis 02-24-2011
The current budget and deficit debate in America is now dominating the daily headlines. There is even talk of shutting down the government if the budget-cutters don't get their way.
Eric Stoner 02-23-2011
For the tenth day in a row, protesters in Libya took to the streets today, despite the use of far more violence from the state than what happened during Egypt's recent uprising.
Rose Marie Berger 02-14-2011

Fourteen mountain-top removal protesters -- including author Wendell Berry -- are in their third day of a sit-in/sleep-in at the Kentucky Governor's Office in Frankfort.

Jeannie Choi 02-11-2011

Here's a little round up of links from around the Web you may have missed this week:

Duane Shank 02-11-2011
After 18 days of ever-growing protests, Egyptian Vice-President Omar Suleiman went on state television with a terse an
Jim Wallis 02-11-2011
I hope that somehow, through the vast network we call social media, this gets to you in Tahrir Square, even on this momentous F
Jim Wallis 02-03-2011

By all journalistic reports, it was the Egyptian government of President Hosni Mubarak that sent thousands of armed thugs into Tahrir Square and the streets of Cairo yesterday to bring violence to w

Jim Wallis 02-02-2011
I am watching the television as Mubarak's thugs attack peaceful demonstrators in the streets of Cairo. Tahrir Square is now a scene of terrible violence.
Jeannie Choi 02-01-2011

There's been a lot of fascinating coverage of the protest in Egypt today. Here's a round up of links and videos you may have missed:

Bryan Farrell 01-27-2011
The massive anti-government protests that flared in Egypt yesterday, in which
Ryan Beiler 01-07-2011

Last Friday, at a protest against the Israeli separation barrier in the West Bank town of Bil'in, Palestinian nonviolent activist Jawaher Abu Rahmah was killed by

Bryan Farrell 11-04-2010
As genetically modified organisms (GMOs) become more prevalent, so do protests against them.
John Dear 09-21-2010
[Editor's Note: Every once in a while there is a landmark court case for the cause of freedom and justice.
Randall Amster 08-16-2010
The clock nudged toward midnight on a cool Arizona summer evening.