David Bazan

Flawed and Freed

I would like to apologize to David Bazan on behalf of all believers as he calls us to task for letting him and others like him down. Yet for mid-life and older folks like myself, I would also like to ask all the Davids to consider what we have come to know in our hearts: This difficult but freeing way has to do with an acceptance—even an expectancy—of the flaws of others, which are our own if we are to be honest. The liberation to follow Jesus comes as we try to live the changes we would like to impose upon others.

Michele Brodoski
Medford, Oregon

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Sojourners Magazine May 2010
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Judged by Our Fruit

While it is unfortunate that David Bazan (“Meditations on Dis-belief,” interview by Jeannie Choi, February 2010) has turned agnostic, his insights on why that happened are instructive to all Christians, especially Christians who have turned their backs on Jesus’ teachings about peace, justice, and the poor. Bazan nailed it when he said: “Believing the right things and not doing any of the right things is the norm in evangelical Christianity.” Fortunately, there is a movement away from the Christianity that aligns itself with wealth and political power and toward a Christianity that aligns itself with the heart of the Person the faith is named after.

Bob Powers
Riverside, California

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Sojourners Magazine May 2010
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Video Interview with David Bazan

Since 1994, David Bazan has put sharp questions about faith, justice, and his Pentecostal-evangelical upbringing front and center in his songs. Like many doubters who came before, from Augustine to Mother Teresa, he wrestled with God while still counting himself as a believer. However, on his most recent solo album, Curse Your Branches, released last September, Bazan's forceful, prodding lyrics find him still grappling with the big questions, but no longer counting himself as a Christian. With his trademark candor and thoughtfulness, Bazan, former front man of Pedro the Lion and Headphones, spoke with Sojourners assistant editor Jeannie Choi in the musty green room of The Black Cat, a music venue in Washington, D.C.

Read the interview with David Bazan, or watch the video below.

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Sojourners Magazine February 2010
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