Juliet Vedral

Juliet Vedral

Juliet is a DC-based writer and self-described "professional church lady." She is a third-generation New Yorker, but has fallen in love with Washington, DC—despite the lack of a really good bagel and schmear.

Juliet holds a BA in media studies from Queens College (CUNY) and an MPA from the School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA) at Columbia University. She held jobs at the New York Times Syndicate, Redeemer Presbyterian Church, and Sojourners before taking a job with a local church in Columbia Heights. She is the editor of a literary blog called The Wheelhouse Review and a devotional blog called Perissos. In addition to writing for Sojourners, she contributes to The Body Politic and the Shalem Institute's Living Contemplatively blog. You can sometimes find her on Twitter. 

Posts By This Author

We Could All Use a Little ‘Wonder’

by Juliet Vedral 11-16-2017

Image via Wonder Facebook page

Auggie’s unusual appearance and suffering under the knife have made him a gentle, kind, and mostly self-aware kid. He faces constant bullying at the hands of a classmate and his friends, but because of his kindness and self-deprecating sense of humor, other students gradually begin to befriend him. As they look past his outward appearance, they can see the wonder of having Auggie in their lives and he can see the wonder that he really is.

What Are Our Churches Doing for Veterans?

by Juliet Vedral 11-10-2017

Image via No Greater Love

In "No Greater Love," a retired U.S. Army chaplain interviews the soldiers from his unit, documenting their service, sacrifice, and suffering.

Discovering Friendship on the Camino

by Juliet Vedral 11-01-2017

While watching the film, seeing one friend sacrifice so much so that the other could have this experience, it becomes clear that the pilgrimage I’ll Push You takes us on is the way of love.

The Spiritual Wisdom of ‘Crazy Ex-Girlfriend’

by Juliet Vedral 10-26-2017

Josh believes that by joining the priesthood, he can legitimately run away from the guilt of leaving Rebecca because he’s doing a noble thing. In a song-and-dance number in this season’s second episode, called “I’ve Got My Head in the Clouds,” he sings, “No obligations are holding me down/that’s what religion is for.” (He later refers to God as his “E-ZPass.”)

God With Us, From This Day Forward

by Juliet Vedral 05-25-2017

No longer will I be the single woman in my 30s, always a bridesmaid but never a bride. It doesn’t mean that I will not struggle to trust God with my life. But it will be a reminder to me — and to all our witnesses — that God does answer prayer, and all the suffering and sorrow that came before can been remade into something more glorious than it was before.

Love Is Ruining My Life

by Juliet Vedral 12-12-2016

When we talk about the Advent season, we use the language of longing. But rarely do we speak about the chaos and glorious disruption that follows when this holy Love arrives. 

3 Things I Learned About White Supremacy From Watching 'The Birth of a Nation'

by Juliet Vedral 10-05-2016

Image via "Birth of a Nation"/Facebook

James Baldwin, the American author wrote about this white inertia:

“Northerners proffer their indignation about the South as a kind of badge, as proof of good intentions; never suspecting that they thus increase, in the heart of the Negro they are speaking to, a kind of helpless pain and rage -- and pity. Negroes know how little most white people are prepared to implement their words with deeds, how little, when the chips are down, they are prepared to risk. And this long history of moral evasion has had an unhealthy effect on the total life of the country, and has eroded whatever respect Negroes may once have felt for white people.” (The Price of the Ticket, p. 266)

I came away from the film asking the question: Knowing that I have white privilege, what am I willing to risk to further the cause of racial justice?

The 15-Year-Old Wounds Our Hearts Remember

by Juliet Vedral 09-11-2016

Image via /Shutterstock.com

Of course, those places were disappearing even when I lived there — that’s part of the charm of New York City, things come and go. In the city that’s very name has been changed to stay current, old things are constantly made new.

But it never became less jarring to note the Twin Towers’ absence on the horizon. 

Weekly Wrap 8.12.16: The 10 Best Stories You Missed This Week

by Juliet Vedral 08-12-2016

Editor's Note: This week's Wrap was guest curated by Sojourners contributor Juliet Vedral. Read along for her top stories and notes from the week!

1. David Crowder: Christians Have to Speak Up for Refugee Children

There are 21.3 million refugees, half of whom are children. The crises that typically create refugees last about 26 years and nearly 34,000 people are forced to flee their homes because of conflict each day. In this piece, musician David Crowder explains why providing education for these kids is a moral imperative.

2. Trump-Loving Christians Owe Bill Clinton an Apology

If you're going to read one of the many articles about evangelicals supporting Donald Trump's candidacy for the presidency, this might be the most important.

Brexit: Who's in Control?

by Juliet Vedral 06-27-2016

Image via /Shutterstock.com

Right now the world is in turmoil. People are frustrated with the status quo, fearful for their lives and for the future. God is in control, but our neighbors need our compassion and comfort too. How do followers of Christ live as faithful witnesses to God’s sovereignty in uncertain times, while also being empathetic and compassionate neighbors?

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