Dawn Cherie Araujo

Editorial Assistant

Dawn Cherie Araujo’s love of writing began at the age of 12 with her first novella, and her love for magazine journalism blossomed in high school where she served as editor of the school magazine and co-editor of the school’s literary magazine.

In 2010, she graduated from Ball State University’s magazine journalism program where she served as assistant editor of Ball Bearings magazine. She will complete her master’s degree in urban and intercultural studies from Cincinnati Bible Seminary in December 2012. Dawn is a member of the Religion Newswriters Association and the International Association of Religion Journalists, and her favorite journalists are Gay Talese and Christiane Amanpour. 

When she’s not geeking out about journalism and religion, Dawn is passionate about human rights (particularly as it relates to food workers and child soldiers), Russian literature, and yoga. Dawn is a recent Pinterest convert and likes making her own organic beauty products.

Posts By This Author

'Pacem in Terris' — 50 Years Later

by Dawn Cherie Araujo 04-11-2013
Ghana’s Cardinal Peter Turkson. Photo by Dawn Araujo / Sojourners

Ghana’s Cardinal Peter Turkson. Photo by Dawn Araujo / Sojourners

On April 11, 1963 Pope John XXIII published an encyclical some initially dismissed as naive and myopic, as too liberal and too lofty. But today, his "Pacem in Terris" is generally lauded as genius and prophetic – well ahead of its time on the issues of human rights, peace, and equality.

As Maryann Cusimano Love, a Catholic professor of international relations, notes, the same year “Pacem in Terris” was published, spelling out the theological mandate for political and social equality for all people, women in Spain were not allowed to open bank accounts, Nelson Mandela was standing trial for fighting apartheid, and Walter Ciszek was serving time in a Soviet gulag simply for being Catholic.

On Monday and Tuesday, the Catholic Peacebuilding Network hosted a two-day conference at the Catholic University of America, commemorating 50 years since the publication of "Pacem in Terris.”

Four Quesitons for Sophoan Rath

by Dawn Cherie Araujo 04-04-2013

Sophoan Rath. Photo by Dawn Araujo.

Sophoan Rath, survivor of the Khmer Rouge regime

New Film Explores Export of American Culture Wars to Eastern Africa

by Dawn Cherie Araujo 03-13-2013
Roger Ross Williams at D.C. film premiere. Photo by Dawn Araujo / Sojourners

Roger Ross Williams at D.C. film premiere. Photo by Dawn Araujo / Sojourners

When Ugandan parliament member, David Bahati, introduced the so-called “Kill the Gays Bill” in 2009, many Americans were shocked, including a group of 60 ecumenical Christian leaders who released a statement deploring the bill.

But as Frank Mugisha told Sojourners magazine earlier this year, what is perhaps more upsetting, albeit little known, is the level of influence American evangelicals have had in crafting Uganda’s violent homophobia.

Academy Award-winning director Roger Ross Williams hopes to put this issue front and center with his new film God Loves Uganda, which made its Washington, D.C., premiere Tuesday night at the Human Rights Campaign headquarters.

The film opens with Rev. Kapaya Kaoma, an Episcopal priest from Boston by way of Zambia, who went to Uganda in 2009 to study the relationship between American conservatives and the Ugandan people. What he found was that “religion was being used to demonize and even to kill.”

Howard's Liberation Theology Weekend Reflects on Black Church's 'Identity Crisis'

by Dawn Cherie Araujo 11-12-2012
Howard University, Angus Osborn / Getty Images

Howard University, Angus Osborn / Getty Images

For many pundits and observers, last week’s election proved that a “new normal” has emerged in America: record numbers of women and ethnic minorities were voted into the House and the Senate, and the House will also see its first Hindu representative in January. Voters in Maine and Maryland approved same-sex marriage, and a diverse coalition of social minorities came together to re-elect the nation's first black president.

But for black theologians, the election has also been an occasion to reflect on how the black church faces an identity crisis, losing track of its mission to lead the way in issues of justice and liberation.

“Something happened to the black church after the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., in 1968,” said Dr. Gayraud Wilmore, one of the founders of black theology, adding that when King died, it seemed that in black congregations, the enthusiasm for black history and racial identity also died.

And for Wilmore, the last 44 years — even the election and re-election of a black president — have done little to abate this crisis.

Incarceration Nation

by Dawn Cherie Araujo 11-02-2012

Putting Americans behind bars is becoming an increasingly lucrative business.

Weapons of Terror

by Dawn Cherie Araujo 10-25-2012
Ami Vitale/Getty Images

Woman whose house burned in Hindu-Muslim violence in Pakistan.Ami Vitale/Getty Images

When the United States dropped atomic bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945, the world was ushered into a period of weapons paranoia. The Cold War, of course, was hallmarked by the obsessive weapons one-upmanship of the United States and the Soviet Union.

Who, then, would have thought that in the 21st century, the seeming weapon of choice would not be some sort of super-nuclear missile or an ultra-deadly biological toxin, but that it would, instead, be women?

“Women are being used as weapons of terror,” Dr. Rubina Greenwood told an audience last week at a congressional briefing on the rights of minority women in Pakistan organized by the Hindu American Foundation. 

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