#*% article, go to: http://www.fish.co.uk/faith/features/bad_language.html ******************* ADVERTISEMENT *************************** DRINK YOUR MORNING CUP OF JAVA IN GOOD CONSCIENCE *BUY SOJOBLEND COFFEE* All of our coffee is "fair trade," which guarantees coffee farmers a set price at least four times higher than the industry average. All of our SojoBlend coffee is shade-grown and organic as well. Call it the "triple seal" of java justice. And just to show that justice doesn't have bad taste, the coffee is just as good or better than you can get at a premium coffee house. Consider making your coffee drinking an act of justice. You can order individual bags - $9.95 a pound - or become a "Constant Cup" member and we'll deliver to you a fresh pound every month. Order now at: http://www.puravidacoffee.com/store_aff_frameset.asp?Aff=5410 ************************************************************* B o o m e r a n g +++++++++++++++++ Sandy Sneddon writes from the Peshawar Diocese Development Office in Pakistan: Mike Brislen [Boomerang, 06-20-02] complains of racism in Western criticism of Pakistanis and Indians' lack of awareness about the consequences of nuclear war in the sub- continent. I cannot comment on the situation in India, but I have some experience of Pakistan as I have lived here for a number of years. It is true, unfortunately, that the public has very little awareness of the dreadful destructive power of nuclear weapons. There is little understanding of the terrible consequences that would result from nuclear war between India and Pakistan. This is not because people are less intelligent - both countries developed these lethal arsenals pretty much indigenously, so there is a high level of technical know-how - but because governments have not informed their citizens and civil society organizations are peripheral to most peoples' experience. The peace movement is tiny and is routinely attacked for being un-patriotic. After Pakistan carried out nuclear tests in 1998 in response to India's tests a few weeks earlier, people were celebrating in the streets and distributing sweets. Even college and university students will say that nuclear weapons are just bigger, more powerful bombs than conventional weapons. Mike, don't be overly politically correct when commenting on Western comments about the situation here. --------------------- Mike Cuellar writes from San Antonio, Texas: Thanks to David Batstone for his South Africa diaries. It's refreshing to read a writer who will cross political allegiances and call things as he sees them. For that matter, it's great to get commentary from both Wallis or Batstone on rotating weeks. It's a good combo. --------------------- Emily Maloney writes from Santa Cruz, California: Re: Jon Franz' Boomerang letter from last week.... To say that the U.S. operates "from a more reasonable and compassionate platform" comes as a surprise to me. We are the leading supplier of military weapons around the world, giving/selling to both sides of a conflict; we have the largest supply of nuclear weapons of any country and are even at this time in the process of developing new "special purpose nuclear weapons"; and our government is in the process of a vast program for the militarization of space - ignoring the Outer Space Treaty. And don't forget the terrorism in which we have engaged around the world - $6 billion to fund a war in El Salvador, the overthrow of Salvador Allende, the mining of the Nicaraguan harbor, the training of foreign military at the School of Assassins in Fort Benning, Georgia, who have been directly involved in the El Mozote massacre in El Salvador, the murder of Archbishop Romero, and the six Jesuits, their housekeeper and her daughter. And currently the incredible assault on civil rights being carried out by Bush and Ashcroft. Reasonable and compassionate we are definitely not! ------------------- Sister Elizabeth Christensen writes from Butler, Wisconsin: I don't like the term "zero tolerance." It seems to be a black-and-white kind of term in a world where we must operate in shades of gray. Is zero tolerance to be used as a measure for judging all sins or crimes of all people, no matter what they do? If not, then why is there a special category for priests? The person who on impulse shoplifts a piece of inexpensive jewelry but makes the situation right by paying for it and goes on to live a productive life in public service is not in the same category as the person who robs, kills, rapes and has a long record of crimes. And the priest who in a moment of weakness touched a teenage girl inappropriately but who repented/apologized and went on to serve the Church for many years is not in the same category as the priest who sexually assaulted a number of children over a period of years. The offenses are different and the punishment must be different. For some who have been accused, the good that they have done over a period of many years far outweighs a momentary lapse of many years past. Those who have been abused are in pain and need justice and healing. There's no question about this. But justice is not served by using one and same punishment for all offenses. I am very grateful that the God I believe in does not judge me with zero tolerance. ------------------ Susan Siens writes from Unity, Maine: I still have not heard anyone address what I think is the fundamental reason for the current scandal within the Catholic Church. The truth of the matter is that many, many Christians have serious sexual problems. What is more attractive to a person with inappropriate sexual desires than a setting in which they can declare themselves miserable sinners, a setting in which sexual matters are hidden and secret, a setting in which sole possession of the truth is constantly reiterated, a setting in which hierarchical relations are the norm? Sexual abuses need to stop being seen as individual crimes only, and also seen as reflective of the culture they occur in. We now live in a promiscuous society, which is simply the other face of a puritanical society. Neither promiscuity or puritanism is indicative of a healthy acceptance of human sexuality, an openness and frank acceptance of this gift of God. ------------------ Mike Rogers writes from Kansas City, Missouri: I write with a broken heart. Last night my wife called me at work to let me know that Kevin, one of our friends and colleagues, had gone fishing and was found shot to death. After the shock wore off my mind went into "pastoral mode" to imagine what to say to his family, and (if I am asked to participate) those who will attend his funeral. An act of mini-terrorism like this may not have the far-reaching impact that an act that kills thousands may have. I believe it does, however, affect the few much deeper because acts of terror like this are targeted at individuals and not at groups. What a challenge to put our Christianity to work in situations like this. Those whose hearts are filled with hatred and vengeance appear to have disqualified themselves from the faith. Those who, from a mournful heart, desire justice from a just God and society are those who genuinely practice the faith. Redemption of the killer(s) must be our goal. This is radical Christianity. I have not always held these views, but Sojourners has been a contributing factor in the formation of my beliefs. Thank you. -------------------------- SojoMail reader Chris Mauldin writes: I want to find Tom Hewitt's book "Little Outlaws, Dirty Angels," mentioned by David Batstone in last week's SojoMail. I went to several Web sites and it was not listed. Please help. ----- Ed. Note: The ISBN is 0-340-73518-X, and the publisher is Hodder & Stoughton. However, about the only place to get a hold of it (it's out of print at the moment) is through Tom's organization, Amos Trust. Go to http://www.amostrust.org and check out the music & books page; Amos doesn't yet take online orders, but the order form can be downloaded. Cost is $10 plus $3 postage, and they can either email us, fax us, or post the order form to us. They take dollars, checks, Visa, MasterCard, and Visa Delta cards. -------------------------- Boomerang is an open forum for all kinds of views. The views expressed are not necessarily those of Sojourners. Want to make your voice heard? Send Boomerang e-mails to the editor: "boomerang@sojo.net" -------------------------------------------------------------- W e b s c e n e +++++++++++++++ This week's best of the Web *World summit on sustainable development Johannesburg Summit 2002 - taking place from August 26 to September 4, 2002, in South Africa - will bring together tens of thousands of participants, including heads of state and government, national delegates, and leaders from non-governmental organizations (NGOs), businesses, and other major groups to focus the world's attention and direct action toward meeting difficult challenges, including improving people's lives and conserving our natural resources in a world that is growing in population, with ever-increasing demands for food, water, shelter, sanitation, energy, health services, and economic security. If your organization wants to participate at the Johannesburg Summit or the global preparatory committee meetings (PrepComs), it must first be accredited with the United Nations. Individuals wishing to participate should be affiliated with an accredited organization. Click here to learn more: http://www.johannesburgsummit.org/html/major_groups/preregistration.html ------------------ *Life is short. Eat biscuits! It's time to start learning about life from our four- legged friends. Start with Calvin, an enlightened canine who offers wisdom that is "part humor, part dog Zen, all fundamental truth." http://www.womenswebdaily.com/eatbiscuits.html ----------- *Become a glossarist Learn the lingo used by everyone from police to paleontologists. Glossarist is an index of links to glossaries you probably never knew existed on the Web. You can browse the index by category or use the search tool to zero in on a specific topic. Go to: http://www.glossarist.com/ -------------------------------------------------------------- To make a secure donation to support our work, go to https://www.sojo.net/Online_Giving -------------------------------------------------------------- ..................... E D I T O R I A L ..................... David Batstone T 415.422.6660 Executive Editor Jim Rice T 202.328.8842 Managing Editor Molly Marsh T 202.328.8842 Assistant Editor Rose Marie Berger T 202.328.8842 Assistant Editor Ryan Beiler T 202.328.8842 Web Editor ................... A D V E R T I S I N G ................... Larry Bellinger T 202.328.8842 Advertising Manager ..................... T E C H N I C A L ..................... Bob Sabath T 202.328.8842 Chief Technologist Jodi Hochstedler T 202.328.8842 Internet Assistant ....................... S 0 J O N E T ....................... 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The Common Good

The G-8 and Moral Scrutiny

Sojomail - June 26, 2002

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++++++++++++++++++++++ 26-June-2002 +++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++ The G-8 and Moral Scrutiny +++++++++++++++++

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 Q u o t e   o f   t h e   W e e k
     *Tyranny of popular culture

 H e a r t s   &   M i n d s
     *The G-8 can't keep out moral scrutiny 

 F u n n y   B u s i n e s s
     *Silly wabbit

 D o w n r i g h t   S p o r t y
     *Idea of Olympic cease-fire gains backing of Orthodox leaders
     *Justice for Joe Gaetjens, America's first soccer hero

 B y   t h e   N u m b e r s
     *Top four nations of death penalty executions

 P. O. V.
     *Edward Said: Hold Palestinian elections now

 S o u l   W o r k s
     *The royal road to heaven

 C u l t u r e   W a t c h
     *On profanity...it's out of control

 B o o m e r a n g
     *SojoMail readers hit reply

 W e b s c e n e
     *World summit on sustainable development
     *Life is short. Eat biscuits!
     *Become a glossarist
     
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Online version (clickable contents):
http://www.sojo.net/sojomail/index.cfm/action/sojomail/issue/062602.html

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Q u o t e   o f   t h e   W e e k
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

"Live your lives free from the tyranny of popular
culture, which would have you believe that wealth,
pleasure, power, status, and youthful looks will
bring you happiness and satisfaction. This is simply
not true."

                 -Stephen A. Privett, S.J., president
                  of the University of San Francisco, offers
                  advice to USF graduates in May.


--------------------------------------------------------------

H e a r t s   &   M i n d s
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++
The G-8 can't keep out moral scrutiny 

by Jim Wallis

This week the heads of the Group of 8 - the world's leading industrialized nations - are holding their annual summit in Canada. The richest and most powerful countries will be meeting at a very remote resort deep in the Canadian wilderness. Presumably, it wasn't the spectacular scenery that drew them, but an out-of-the way location, far away from easy access for protesters. They may or may not succeed in keeping the demonstrators away, but they will not be able to keep out the moral scrutiny of their actions. Once again, issues of debt relief, especially for Africa, are on the agenda.

It's only been four years since 70,000 people formed a human chain around the G-8 meeting in Birmingham, England, marking the first major appearance of the Jubilee movement. Much has been accomplished in the years since then. The network of celebrities, faith communities, and millions of people around the world have brought a moral spotlight to the unsustainable indebtedness of the world's poorest countries. And the world has begun to address the problem.

The limited debt relief provided to these poor countries has made some significant changes in living conditions. Jubilee USA reports, for example, that in Uganda, debt savings were used to double elementary school enrollment; in Mozambique half a million were vaccinated against deadly diseases. Tanzania used debt savings to eliminate school fees and 1.5 million children will be able to return to school this year, while in Honduras savings went toward access to junior high school for all young people.

Yet major problems remain with the "Heavily Indebted Poor Country Initiative" (HIPC) - as the current program is called.

Only 26 of the 42 countries considered to be "heavily indebted poor" have qualified for relief and their annual debt payments only reduced by 1/3. And the relief that is offered takes too long to provide any real benefit. After six years of the HIPC, only five countries have completed the program.

It also provides too little relief. The HIPC defines "debt sustainability" as countries whose outstanding debt is 150% more than its annual exports. Only those countries are eligible for relief. But that definition is already outdated - as prices drop for exports, the relief will end up being too small to reduce the debt for many countries to even that "sustainable" level of 150% of exports. Uganda, for example, has completed the program, but still has an "unsustainable" debt projected by the World Bank at 250% of exports.

More equitable trade practices are also crucial to seriously reduce poverty. Countries who rely on the export of raw materials to the industrialized world are simply at the mercy of market forces that lead to further indebtedness.

This G-8 Summit will have a special focus on Africa. Jubilee notes that half of the countries in Africa pay more on debt service than on health care while 6,000 people a day are dying from AIDS. Estimates are that stopping the epidemic would cost $7-10 billion annually, while Africa pays $13.5 billion annually on debt service. It is past time to label such policies for what they are - unconscionable (not to mention stupid).

African leaders have developed a plan they call the "New Partnership for African Development" that would provide greater aid and investment - a "Marshall Plan for Africa." The plan will be presented to the G-8 leaders with the support of Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chretien, British Prime Minister Tony Blair, and U.N. Secretary General Kofi Annan. It includes increased aid along with fairer trade and investment policies.

Definitive debt cancellation coupled with trade justice, rather than flawed, piecemeal programs, is now crucial for addressing global economic inequality and improving the lives of millions of the poorest of the poor around the world. Debt, aid, and trade are the pillars of global poverty reduction, and they are becoming the moral imperatives of a growing popular movement, which has strong support in the faith community. You can run off to the resort, but you can't hide from that moral challenge.

--------------------------------------------------------------

F u n n y   B u s i n e s s
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Silly wabbit

The Justice Department took a rabbit and let it loose in the woods. They told the CIA to go find it. After two weeks the CIA returned empty handed and reported the rabbit never existed. The missing rabbit was then turned over to the FBI who burned down the forest and reported back that the rabbit had it coming. Next the L.A. police department was given the assignment. They returned with a beat-up raccoon who was yelling, "I am a rabbit, I am a rabbit!"

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*************************************************************

D o w n r i g h t   S p o r t y
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Idea of Olympic cease-fire gains backing of Orthodox leaders

Warsaw (ENI). A movement to revive the ancient Olympic truce under which wars were suspended during the Olympic Games has gained the support of half a dozen Orthodox patriarchs. The Orthodox leaders have added their names to those of 100 other church and government leaders who have signed a formal appeal for a worldwide truce during the games, scheduled for Athens in 2004. "If the Olympic Truce can help us bring about even a brief respite from conflict and strife, it will send a powerful message of hope to the international community," says the appeal, launched in November of last year.

---------------

Justice for Joe Gaetjens, America's first soccer hero
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Although the U.S. is now out of soccer's World Cup, we do well to remember the hero of America's first "soccer shocker," the Haitian-born Joe Gaetjens. Gaetjens was responsible for the 1-0 against England in the 1950 World Cup. His goal in the 39th minute eliminated England from the Cup and gained for the U.S. a place among soccer's elites.

But it is not Gaetjens' beautiful goal that matters. It is his fate. Gaetjens is among the "disappeared." He has not been seen alive since July 8, 1964, when he disappeared in one of Duvalier's prisons. It is time to call upon the current government of Haiti to bring to justice those responsible for Mr. Gaetjens' imprisonment and - likely - death. Only when justice is done would we be able to remember Gaetjens' goal in the 39th minute rather than the 38 years of silence since his "disappearance."

*Submitted by SojoMail reader Armando Corbelle

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B y   t h e   N u m b e r s
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Top four nations of death penalty executions

1. China
2. Iran
3. Saudi Arabia
4. United States

*Source: Amnesty International

--------------------------------------------------------------

P. O. V.
+++++++++
Palestinian elections now

by Edward Said

We have never faced a worse, or at the same time, a more seminal moment. The Arab order is in total disarray; the U.S. administration is effectively controlled by the Christian Right and the Israeli lobby (within 24 hours, everything that George Bush seems to have agreed with President Mubarak was reversed by Sharon's visit); and our society has been nearly wrecked by poor leadership and the insanity of thinking that suicide bombing will lead directly to an Islamic Palestinian state. There is always hope for the future, but one has to able to look for it and find it in the right place. It is quite clear that in the absence of any serious Palestinian or Arab information policy in the United States (especially in the Congress), we cannot for a moment delude ourselves that Powell and Bush are about to set a real agenda for Palestinian rehabilitation. That's why I keep saying that the effort must come from us, by us, for us. I'm at least trying to suggest a different avenue of approach.

Who else but the Palestinian people can construct the legitimacy they need to rule themselves and fight the occupation with weapons that don't kill innocents and lose us more support than ever before? A just cause can easily be subverted by evil or inadequate or corrupt means. The sooner this is realised the better the chance we have to lead ourselves out of the present impasse.

To read the entire column written by this Arab-American intellectual, who was born in Jerusalem, go to:

http://www.ahram.org.eg/weekly/2002/590/op2.htm

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S o u l   W o r k s
+++++++++++++++++++
The royal road to heaven

Do not be dismayed, daughters, at the number of things
which you have to consider before setting out on this
divine journey, which is the royal road to heaven. By
taking this road we gain such precious treasures that it
is no wonder if the cost seems to us a high one. The time
will come when we shall realize that all we have paid has
been nothing at all by comparison with the greatness of
our prize.  

                            - Saint Teresa of Avila

--------------------------------------------------------------

C u l t u r e   W a t c h
++++++++++++++++++++++++++
On profanity...it's out of control

by Martin Wroe

Expletives, profanities, and obscenities are now the routine refuge of comedians who can't think up jokes, advertisers who can't think up campaigns, songwriters who can't think up lyrics and journalists who can't think up sentences. The swear word is losing its potency. The diversity of our language is in peril.

To read more of this *#>#*% article, go to:

http://www.fish.co.uk/faith/features/bad_language.html

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Call it the "triple seal" of java justice. And just
to show that justice doesn't have bad taste, the
coffee is just as good or better than you can get
at a premium coffee house.

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B o o m e r a n g
+++++++++++++++++

Sandy Sneddon writes from the Peshawar Diocese Development Office in Pakistan:

Mike Brislen [Boomerang, 06-20-02] complains of racism in Western criticism of Pakistanis and Indians' lack of awareness about the consequences of nuclear war in the sub- continent. I cannot comment on the situation in India, but I have some experience of Pakistan as I have lived here for a number of years. It is true, unfortunately, that the public has very little awareness of the dreadful destructive power of nuclear weapons. There is little understanding of the terrible consequences that would result from nuclear war between India and Pakistan. This is not because people are less intelligent - both countries developed these lethal arsenals pretty much indigenously, so there is a high level of technical know-how - but because governments have not informed their citizens and civil society organizations are peripheral to most peoples' experience. The peace movement is tiny and is routinely attacked for being un-patriotic.

After Pakistan carried out nuclear tests in 1998 in response to India's tests a few weeks earlier, people were celebrating in the streets and distributing sweets. Even college and university students will say that nuclear weapons are just bigger, more powerful bombs than conventional weapons.

Mike, don't be overly politically correct when commenting on Western comments about the situation here.

---------------------

Mike Cuellar writes from San Antonio, Texas:

Thanks to David Batstone for his South Africa diaries. It's refreshing to read a writer who will cross political allegiances and call things as he sees them.

For that matter, it's great to get commentary from both Wallis or Batstone on rotating weeks. It's a good combo.

---------------------

Emily Maloney writes from Santa Cruz, California:

Re: Jon Franz' Boomerang letter from last week.... To say that the U.S. operates "from a more reasonable and compassionate platform" comes as a surprise to me. We are the leading supplier of military weapons around the world, giving/selling to both sides of a conflict; we have the largest supply of nuclear weapons of any country and are even at this time in the process of developing new "special purpose nuclear weapons"; and our government is in the process of a vast program for the militarization of space - ignoring the Outer Space Treaty.

And don't forget the terrorism in which we have engaged around the world - $6 billion to fund a war in El Salvador, the overthrow of Salvador Allende, the mining of the Nicaraguan harbor, the training of foreign military at the School of Assassins in Fort Benning, Georgia, who have been directly involved in the El Mozote massacre in El Salvador, the murder of Archbishop Romero, and the six Jesuits, their housekeeper and her daughter. And currently the incredible assault on civil rights being carried out by Bush and Ashcroft.

Reasonable and compassionate we are definitely not!

-------------------

Sister Elizabeth Christensen writes from Butler, Wisconsin:

I don't like the term "zero tolerance." It seems to be a black-and-white kind of term in a world where we must operate in shades of gray. Is zero tolerance to be used as a measure for judging all sins or crimes of all people, no matter what they do? If not, then why is there a special category for priests?

The person who on impulse shoplifts a piece of inexpensive jewelry but makes the situation right by paying for it and goes on to live a productive life in public service is not in the same category as the person who robs, kills, rapes and has a long record of crimes. And the priest who in a moment of weakness touched a teenage girl inappropriately but who repented/apologized and went on to serve the Church for many years is not in the same category as the priest who sexually assaulted a number of children over a period of years. The offenses are different and the punishment must be different. For some who have been accused, the good that they have done over a period of many years far outweighs a momentary lapse of many years past.

Those who have been abused are in pain and need justice and healing. There's no question about this. But justice is not served by using one and same punishment for all offenses. I am very grateful that the God I believe in does not judge me with zero tolerance.

------------------

Susan Siens writes from Unity, Maine:

I still have not heard anyone address what I think is the fundamental reason for the current scandal within the Catholic Church. The truth of the matter is that many, many Christians have serious sexual problems. What is more attractive to a person with inappropriate sexual desires than a setting in which they can declare themselves miserable sinners, a setting in which sexual matters are hidden and secret, a setting in which sole possession of the truth is constantly reiterated, a setting in which hierarchical relations are the norm?

Sexual abuses need to stop being seen as individual crimes only, and also seen as reflective of the culture they occur in. We now live in a promiscuous society, which is simply the other face of a puritanical society. Neither promiscuity or puritanism is indicative of a healthy acceptance of human sexuality, an openness and frank acceptance of this gift of God.

------------------

Mike Rogers writes from Kansas City, Missouri:

I write with a broken heart. Last night my wife called me at work to let me know that Kevin, one of our friends and colleagues, had gone fishing and was found shot to death. After the shock wore off my mind went into "pastoral mode" to imagine what to say to his family, and (if I am asked to participate) those who will attend his funeral.

An act of mini-terrorism like this may not have the far-reaching impact that an act that kills thousands may have. I believe it does, however, affect the few much deeper because acts of terror like this are targeted at individuals and not at groups. What a challenge to put our Christianity to work in situations like this. Those whose hearts are filled with hatred and vengeance appear to have disqualified themselves from the faith. Those who, from a mournful heart, desire justice from a just God and society are those who genuinely practice the faith. Redemption of the killer(s) must be our goal. This is radical Christianity.

I have not always held these views, but Sojourners has been a contributing factor in the formation of my beliefs. Thank you.

--------------------------

SojoMail reader Chris Mauldin writes:

I want to find Tom Hewitt's book "Little Outlaws, Dirty Angels," mentioned by David Batstone in last week's SojoMail. I went to several Web sites and it was not listed. Please help.

-----
Ed. Note: The ISBN is 0-340-73518-X, and the publisher is Hodder & Stoughton. However, about the only place to get a hold of it (it's out of print at the moment) is through Tom's organization, Amos Trust. Go to http://www.amostrust.org and check out the music & books page; Amos doesn't yet take online orders, but the order form can be downloaded. Cost is $10 plus $3 postage, and they can either email us, fax us, or post the order form to us. They take dollars, checks, Visa, MasterCard, and Visa Delta cards.

--------------------------

Boomerang is an open forum for all kinds of views. The views expressed are not necessarily those of Sojourners. Want to make your voice heard? Send Boomerang e-mails to the editor:

"boomerang@sojo.net"

--------------------------------------------------------------

W e b s c e n e
+++++++++++++++
This week's best of the Web

*World summit on sustainable development

Johannesburg Summit 2002 - taking place from August 26 to September 4, 2002, in South Africa - will bring together tens of thousands of participants, including heads of state and government, national delegates, and leaders from non-governmental organizations (NGOs), businesses, and other major groups to focus the world's attention and direct action toward meeting difficult challenges, including improving people's lives and conserving our natural resources in a world that is growing in population, with ever-increasing demands for food, water, shelter, sanitation, energy, health services, and economic security.

If your organization wants to participate at the Johannesburg Summit or the global preparatory committee meetings (PrepComs), it must first be accredited with the United Nations. Individuals wishing to participate should be affiliated with an accredited organization. Click here to learn more:

http://www.johannesburgsummit.org/html/major_groups/preregistration.html

------------------

*Life is short. Eat biscuits!

It's time to start learning about life from our four- legged friends. Start with Calvin, an enlightened canine who offers wisdom that is "part humor, part dog Zen, all fundamental truth."

http://www.womenswebdaily.com/eatbiscuits.html

-----------

*Become a glossarist

Learn the lingo used by everyone from police to paleontologists. Glossarist is an index of links to glossaries you probably never knew existed on the Web. You can browse the index by category or use the search tool to zero in on a specific topic. Go to:

http://www.glossarist.com/

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