The Common Good

America's #1 Problem

Source: OpEdNews.com
Date: February 5, 2006
America's #1 problem is not listening to George W. Bush.

If one listens to his supporters after a speech, one wonders if there is a common "American-English" language anymore. His supporters tend to make his words sit wherever they want them to fit.

Listening to his opponents is difficult because most run out of a room the moment he starts to speak- leaving nothing but expletives in their wake.

Sadly, neither side really hears him or understands what he is saying.

His Social Security "reform", his attacks on all other aspects of the "safety-net", his lack of response to Katrina, and his NSA eavesdropping were all predictable and available for anyone to anticipate- if they had listened.

George W. Bush is a great cheerleader but a hopeless co-conspirator. The man can't help but giggle out his (and his "Rangers"- Whoo-Yahh!!!) intentions prior to their taking place.

Had anybody done their homework (like Wall Street did), they would have known the direction the country would take.

After all, this is a man who, in business school, said, "People are poor because they are lazy" and that the Federal Trade Commission and the Securities Exchange Commission were "unnecessary hindrances" to "free market competition".

He thought that Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal was "socialism". Had it been done (the homework- that is) voters may have found that he opposed Social Security, Medicare, Environmental Protection, Public Schools, and Labor Unions. All while he sat at a cushy chair at Harvard Business School.

Even had it not been done (the homework about his early years), he gave ample warning about his intentions on how to manipulate. He was taught early in his career. When asked to run for Governor of Texas by businessmen he said, "You know I could run for governor but I'm basically a media creation…"

Aahh yes, the media creation. It gets better though because Boy George couldn't hold back his exuberance both during his run for "President" and subsequent to his being allowed to sit in a place where giants sat.

For those amazed at how he could take the country into a fiscal disaster, a military disaster, and a moral disaster, consider what he said to a reporter as he was campaigning for the Oval Office in 1999 and the Texas financial books were found to be cooked: "I hope I'm not here to have to deal with it".

FUUUNNNYYY STUFF! A guy you want to have a beer with.

Then he got "elected". For those that are still scratching their heads about Katrina and dispense with his talk in business school as the simple words of a young man, the guy sitting in the Oval Office said, "I don't understand how poor people think..." after the 2000 election to the Reverend Jim Wallis, leader of Call to Renewal, a network of churches that fight poverty.

The NSA thing is interesting. It is one of the reasons one must listen to the bubbling brook Bush so intently. It is not that he makes his pronouncements officially. They tend to leak out of him because of his boyish excitement.

That's why it's important to listen to his "off the cuff" remarks. Worried about your e-mail, browsing, and purchasing records? He was way ahead of you and gave you a "heads up!" warning on April 5, 2001 at the American Society of Newspaper Editors during their annual convention held at the Marriott Hotel in Washington D.C.

Boy George told them, "I'll give you one area, though, where I'm very cautious, and that's about e-mailing. I used to be an avid e-mailer, and I e-mailed to my daughters or e-mailed to my father, for example. And I don't want those e-mails to be in public -- in the public domain. So I don't e-mail any more, out of concern for freedom of information laws, but also concern for my privacy."

Interesting. Upon hearing that at first one would walk away not thinking much. But digesting it might produce something like: Doesn't the White House have the "best and the brightest" working on secure communications? In light of the question, which had to do with freedom of information laws, why would a note to a daughter or a father not be considered endearing to the public even IF it were to be made public?

Or perhaps a bigger question. Why isn't the privacy of the average American (presumably one with absolutely NOTHING... REALLY, REALLY, NOTHING to hide or keep private) worth as much as this obviously exceptional moral man?

It's kind of funny, in a way, there are no pictures of average Americans kissing or holding the hand, in a loving way, with one of the leaders of the main financiers (Saudis) of the butchery currently called the GWOT.

For those frothing at the mouth over illegal aliens, he also said some interesting things about immigration and jobs in 2001 (you "shoulda" seen it coming).

Ask Jeeves, Google, Yahoo (or whatever other search engine is available) to look it up. Ask a simple question: "Anyone who wants a job...?"

Then determine the "framing" of his statement and determine where the "average" American hoping to achieve or continue the "American Way Of Life (aka "Our Way of Life") fits in when it comes to BushLand.