The Common Good
June 2010

Faith and Feminism Resources

by Kimberly B. George, Letha Dawson Scanzoni | June 2010

These resources on the intersection of faith and feminism were compiled by Kimberly B.

These resources on the intersection of faith and feminism were compiled by Kimberly B. George and Letha Dawson Scanzoni, authors of “Liberating History: Cross-generational blogging about faith and feminism,” in the June 2010 issue of Sojourners.

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Web Sites and Blogs:

EEWC-Christian Feminism Today (Web site of the Evangelical & Ecumenical Women’s Caucus, of which the 72-27 blog is a part). Select articles from Christian Feminism Today, some audios of speeches and music from EEWC conferences, and a quarterly feature, "Web Explorations for Christian Feminists," in which Letha Dawson Scanzoni provides links to online articles, audios and videos, and movie recommendations, all with her personal commentary.

Christians for Biblical Equality (CBE International). Articles, book lists, and various study resources emphasizing biblical teachings on the equality of women and men, including service in the church based on gifts rather than gender.

Faith and Gender: A Necessary Conversation,” a blog by Kimberly B. George. From her statement of purpose “My desire is for men and women of diverse backgrounds to partner together and listen more deeply to each other’s voices, as we realize what is at stake in how we construct our ideas of gender within churches and the greater culture.”

Letha’s personal website and “Letha’s Calling” blog, which now includes reprints of the original manuscripts of her two earliest articles on biblical feminism: "Woman's Place: Silence or Service" (Eternity magazine, 1966) and "Elevate Marriage to Partnership" (Eternity magazine, 1968), along with the stories behind their writing and publication.

Also, one more online article that might be of interest to Sojourners readers who are familiar with the work of the late Fuller Theological Seminary professor, David Scholer, is this one from Christian Feminism Today: "My Fifty Year Journey with Women and Ministry in the New Testament and in the Church Today."

Books

All We're Meant to Be: Biblical Feminism for Today, by Letha Dawson Scanzoni and Nancy A. Hardesty. (First published in 1974 and now out of print, it went through several editions; the latest revised and expanded edition was published by Eerdmans in 1992.) In October 2006, Christianity Today named All We’re Meant to Be as one of “the top fifty books that have shaped evangelicals, with the comment that “Scanzoni and Hardesty outlined what would later blossom into evangelical feminism." While written in the ‘70s, readers will quickly see that this text is as relevant today as it was upon its original publishing.

Jesus Girls: True Tales of Growing Up Female and Evangelical, edited by Hannah Faith Notess (Cascade Books, 2009). A new anthology featuring both emerging and established writers, it includes creative nonfiction essays covering everything from flannel boards, dc Talk, and church camp, to writings on abortion and sexuality. Kimberly has a chapter titled “Feminist-in-Waiting” in this book.

Dating Jesus: A Story of Fundamentalism. Feminism, and the American Girl, by Susan Campbell (Beacon Press, 2009). This is Hartford Courant newspaper columnist Susan Campbell's compelling and humorous autobiographical account of growing up in a Missouri fundamentalist church. A profile of Susan Campbell was published in Christian Feminism Today in advance of the book's publication, which was later reviewed by Virginia Ramey Mollenkott.

Taking Back God: American Women Rising Up for Religious Equality, by Leora Tanenbaum (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2009). Explores the attitudes and actions of women today from various faith traditions who are challenging the notion that women should be regarded as second-class citizens in their religious institutions. A review by Alena Amato Ruggerio from Christian Feminism Today is online.

Inclusive Language in the Church, by Nancy A. Hardesty (John Knox Press, 1987).

Women Called to Witness: Evangelical Feminism in the Nineteenth Century, by Nancy A. Hardesty. 2nd edition (University of Tennessee Press, 1999).

New Feminist Christianity: Many Voices, Many Views, edited by Mary E. Hunt and Diann Neu (Skylight Paths, scheduled for summer 2010 release). Letha has a chapter titled "Why We Need Evangelical Feminists" in this anthology.

A Troubling in My Soul: Womanist Perspectives on Evil and Suffering, Edited by Emilie M. Townes (Orbis, 1993). This collection of essays written by African-American women raise much needed questions about the nature of sin, evil, suffering, and redemption. Townes is a professor of African-American religion and theology at Yale Divinity School.

Feminist Theory and Christian Theology, by Serene Jones (Fortress Press, 2000). This highly accessible book, written by the president of Union Seminary, takes a thoughtful look at Christian theology through the prism of feminist questions and concerns.

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