The Common Good

Table of Contents

Cover Story

Wanna do something about globalization? You might start by learning a little history.

Features

Pura Vida coffee—like most companies—goes after profits, but what happens next is hardly ordinary.
Fair-trade and shade-grown: good words for impressing your tree-hugging, java-loving friends. But do you know enough to convince the co-worker who's sold on Starbucks?
An interview with environmental minister Sally Bingham
Architecture students at Alabama's Rural Studio raise shelters for the spirit.
How to tell the difference between the good and a Good Thing OR What I learned from a domestic dominatrix.
An interview with musician Ani DiFranco—founder of Righteous Babe Records and folk-punk troubadour of the secular Left.

Commentary

Just exactly how are nuclear weapons supposed to help us wipe out terrorism?
The deepest guilt is the church's.
The Nation of Islam leans toward the mainstream.
Pursuing truth is always a risky venture.
It takes real faith to make change happen.

Columns

For
those who care about poverty in America, the coming months are a critical time, a turning
point similar to the New Deal of the 1930s or the War on Poverty in the 1960s.

Want
some free financial consultation? It won't take more than a few seconds, I promise.

In Boston, more Catholic
priests made the news as serial pedophiles. In California, two pastors got 4 million hits
in a week on their Web site for people addicted to pornography.

The
wise man built his house upon the rock.

The foolish man built his house upon the sand.

Then the foolish man sold his house to me,

Culture Watch

TV's first all-Latino drama broadens the cultural picture.
When I heard about the death of country singer Waylon Jennings in February, my mind flashed back to the day I first bought one of his records.
Moving toward the end of the Year of Sept. 11, my favorite things are books and music with insight into life's big picture, the meaning of the journey that we're all on:
The film opens with a faint sound, a vibration that says something's coming, and so you listen very closely.
The members of her New Orleans church call her "Sister Shocked." She's the Ms. Shocked who sued the Mercury record label under the 13th amendment—that's the anti-slavery amendment—to o
During the mid-1960s, traditional forms of private confession seemed to disappear abruptly from Roman Catholic practice, according to James O'Toole, associate professor of history at Boston Coll
It takes the rare vocal talents of a singer like Lila Downs to silence a Madrid crowd—and convince them to put out their cigarettes without complaining.
His image is used to promote cement companies and bakeries, and to sell music CDs, videotapes, T-shirts, hats, mugs, and potato chips.

Departments

I once met a woman who— in a frenzy of wild praise and to fight the devil—ate glass. Not shot glasses, juice glasses, or tumblers; not pub pints
These weeks from Easter to Pentecost memorialize the calling forth and sending out of Jesus' witnesses.
When one thinks about homelessness, it's unlikely that the terms "network" or "mentoring" come to mind.
Employment Opportunities
It might seem that "globalization" didn't exist before the widely publicized protests in Seattle during the November 1999 WTO meetings.