The Common Good

Uncommon seeks to address racial and economic divides by offering college campuses a race and poverty speaking tour that will build and strengthen the capacity of your community to make the connection between faith, poverty, and racial equity. Find out how to bring the Tour to your church or campus!

Photo by Seph Kumer (First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant)

"[Lisa] awoke my senses to the beauty and amazement of the gospel. She spoke it with such fresh words and insight. She opened her mouth, and the Spirit of God poured out onto this dry and thirsty heart of mine. I felt as if I was once again alive to God's call for justice in this world.”

Discussion guides, documentaries, books, magazine articles, and more. Find all of the ways you can start the conversation about The Budget and Your Neighbor.

About Sojourners The Uncommon Tour

Racial and economic division persists in our world and within the body of Christ. The Uncommon Tour helps college campuses and churches to make the connection between faith, poverty, and racial equity for the common good. Through preaching, teaching, and training Uncommon equips communities to engage issues of justice in the public square in a way that draws from the roots of Christianity and leads to ongoing advocacy in partnership with “the least of these.”

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From the Magazine & Blog

When Ireland became the first country to legalize same-gender marriage by popular mandate, double rainbows appeared over Dublin, and an Irish rock band transformed their Arizona concert into a gay-rights celebration.
Socioeconomic reconciliation is the removal of gaps in opportunity, achievement, health, thriving, and well-being that exist between groups of people in our nation and world. In the face of myriad breaches of the common human bond and experience, a breakthrough act of the Spirit today would activate and agitate the established church in her ministry: a ministry of socioeconomic reconciliation.
The similarities in the stories in Baltimore and Jerusalem are uncanny.
If Christians are going to take seriously Jesus’ command to follow him, then we need to stop this absurd defense of drawing pictures of Muhammad. And if we defend the practice of ridiculing our fellow human beings by hiding behind the freedom of speech, then we have made freedom of speech into an idol.
We are learning the demographic facts about the shift of world Christianity to the global South. But what does this mean? What is God doing? And what are we called to do?