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The recent agreement with Iran relating to its nuclear program is totally in keeping with the requirement of Just War Doctrine that the military use of force be considered only as a court of last resort. Despite the fears of the naysayers, pressing ahead with nonviolent options as the Western powers are currently doing is absolutely the right thing to do.

Obama has personally ordered drone strikes. Keith Tarrier and spirit of america

As we seek faithful ways to engage governments with the spirit of Jesus's love and reconciliation, it is vitally important for us to reject our country's capitulation to violence and refuse to let it be the norm.

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Within five years, the Bush administration's misguided invasion of Iraq has transformed under the Obama administration into preemptive assassinations halfway around the world. Dirty Wars author Jeremy Scahill sat down with Sojourners to discuss his book, documentary, and the moral implications of drone warfare.

Newtown prayer vigil in April. Photo by Brandon Hook / Sojourners

Yesterday, as the culmination of its No More Names bus tour, which reached 25 states in 100 days, Mayors Against Illegal Guns rallied at the Capitol to urge Congress to pass a bill enforcing mandatory background checks for potential gun owners.

Graphic from "Sorrow, Anger, ACTION! - A Gathering of Voices Against Gun Violenc

I will never forget walking onto the National Mall in early April, 2013. I was overcome by the sight of more than 3,300 crosses and other religious symbols rising from the heart of our capital city, representing the graves of all who have died by gunfire since the shooting massacre at Newtown, Conn. 

About Sojourners Peace & Nonviolence

In a world marred by violence and destruction, we must remember the words of Jesus: Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God (Matthew 5:9).

Our world faces a major challenge of how to resolve conflicts, reduce violence, and defeat terrorism without preemptive war. War has too often become the first choice instead of the last resort. In a world with terrorists, terrorist states, unilateralist superpowers, and weapons of mass destruction, alternatives to an endless cycle of violence are needed. As an organization, we articulate the prophetic call to peace and help Christians engage their political leaders to seek alternatives to war.

Sojourners has an historic commitment to confronting violence and being a consistent witness to the Biblical call for peacemaking. Founded in the 1970s, at the height of the Vietnam War, our initial mission was to bring the call to end that war into the evangelical church. In the years since, we have played a leading role in the movement for nuclear disarmament, opposing the first Gulf War, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and threats of attack against Iran.  

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From the Magazine & Blog

The empty shoes came in all shapes and sizes — cowboy boots and sneakers, children’s sparkly shoes and women’s dress shoes. They filled step after step going up toward the entrance of the Wisconsin State Capitol. The shoes — 467 pair of them — represented the death toll from guns in just one state: Wisconsin. "I want you to look at these empty shoes," Jeri Bonavia, told the crowd gathered on the Capitol steps on Monday. "I want you to bear witness. All across our state, families are aching with emptiness." Bonavia is the executive director of the Wisconsin Anti-Violence Effort, which is using this display of empty shoes in five cities around the state this week. In the nationwide scheme of things, Wisconsin has a lower death rate from guns than the nation as a whole. The annual average of 467 from murder, suicide and accidents is just a fraction of the approximately 30,000 gun deaths each year across the U.S. And yet the row upon row of empty shoes on the steps spoke to the heartache that comes with each death, whatever the toll in whatever state.
The headlines and talk shows are dominated by the response ISIS. To be clear, this group readily uses fanatical and brutal actions to achieve its radically exclusive vision. The images they skillfully project are like violent, X-rated video games made real. No wonder that many react to this horror with chills going down their spines. But there is something that worries me more: the ongoing Ebola crisis.
Three elderly Italian nuns murdered in Burundi were laid to rest Sept. 11 in a Xaverian cemetery in the Democratic Republic of Congo amid heightened calls for action about their death.
I have always believed that any alternative to war must still address the very real problems at hand — just in a more effective way. To say that “war is not the answer” is not only a moral statement but also is a serious critique of what doesn’t work; wars often fail to solve the problems and ultimately make them worse.
It’s been 14 years since our government declared war on terrorism. How are we doing?