The Common Good
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The recent agreement with Iran relating to its nuclear program is totally in keeping with the requirement of Just War Doctrine that the military use of force be considered only as a court of last resort. Despite the fears of the naysayers, pressing ahead with nonviolent options as the Western powers are currently doing is absolutely the right thing to do.

Obama has personally ordered drone strikes. Keith Tarrier and spirit of america

As we seek faithful ways to engage governments with the spirit of Jesus's love and reconciliation, it is vitally important for us to reject our country's capitulation to violence and refuse to let it be the norm.

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Within five years, the Bush administration's misguided invasion of Iraq has transformed under the Obama administration into preemptive assassinations halfway around the world. Dirty Wars author Jeremy Scahill sat down with Sojourners to discuss his book, documentary, and the moral implications of drone warfare.

Newtown prayer vigil in April. Photo by Brandon Hook / Sojourners

Yesterday, as the culmination of its No More Names bus tour, which reached 25 states in 100 days, Mayors Against Illegal Guns rallied at the Capitol to urge Congress to pass a bill enforcing mandatory background checks for potential gun owners.

Graphic from "Sorrow, Anger, ACTION! - A Gathering of Voices Against Gun Violenc

I will never forget walking onto the National Mall in early April, 2013. I was overcome by the sight of more than 3,300 crosses and other religious symbols rising from the heart of our capital city, representing the graves of all who have died by gunfire since the shooting massacre at Newtown, Conn. 

About Sojourners Peace & Nonviolence

In a world marred by violence and destruction, we must remember the words of Jesus: Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God (Matthew 5:9).

Our world faces a major challenge of how to resolve conflicts, reduce violence, and defeat terrorism without preemptive war. War has too often become the first choice instead of the last resort. In a world with terrorists, terrorist states, unilateralist superpowers, and weapons of mass destruction, alternatives to an endless cycle of violence are needed. As an organization, we articulate the prophetic call to peace and help Christians engage their political leaders to seek alternatives to war.

Sojourners has an historic commitment to confronting violence and being a consistent witness to the Biblical call for peacemaking. Founded in the 1970s, at the height of the Vietnam War, our initial mission was to bring the call to end that war into the evangelical church. In the years since, we have played a leading role in the movement for nuclear disarmament, opposing the first Gulf War, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and threats of attack against Iran.  

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From the Magazine & Blog

After the high-profile domestic violence cases of Ray Rice and Adrian Peterson, the NFL is speaking out with a new Super Bowl Ad.
The concrete victories of modern nonviolent campaigns, the devastating destruction of ongoing violent campaigns, and the moral demands of Christian faith all focus a clear imperative. It is time for the Christian church – indeed all people of faith – to explore, in a more sustained and sophisticated way than ever before in human history, what can be done nonviolently.
In 2010, the book, The Boy Who Came Back From Heaven, was released. At the time, I believe I gave this news about 0.3 percent of my attention, and 0.1 percent was spent lamenting terrible theology prevalent in the popular Christian book market. It came as no surprise when last week The Boy Who Came Back From Heaven retracted his story.
In the U.S., the criminal justice system disproportionately incarcerates people of color for petty offenses. Many take plea bargains under threat of excessive, punitive sentences. If I were a young black male, the U.S. penal system quite likely would not have allowed me to turn myself in to a federal prison camp.
While the tenet of freedom of speech has been invoked throughout the media coverage of the attacks, the religious implications here run much deeper. They are about how we in the faith community should respond when we are attacked by those who disdain us, disrespect us, distort us — as many believe the satirical French magazine, Charlie Hebdo regularly did — and even viciously attack us