The Common Good

Weekly Wrap

The Top 10 Stories of June 12, 2013

Quote of the day.
"We are cursed as human beings with this element that''s called hatred, prejudice and racism. But it is my belief that, as it was Medgar''s, that there is something good and decent in each and every one of us, and we have to call on that, and we have to find a way to work together." Myrlie Evers-Williams, widow of former NAACP leader Medgar Evers, who was murdered on June 12, 1963, 50 years ago today.
(Associated Press)

+Continue Reading

The Top 10 Stories of June 11, 2013

Quote of the day.
"Each day in our parishes, social service programs, hospitals, and schools, we witness the human consequences of a broken immigration system. Families are separated, migrant workers are exploited, and our fellow human beings die in the desert. This suffering must end." Los Angeles Archbishop Jose H. Gomez, chairman of the USCCB's Committee on Migration, speaking as the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops opens its annual spring meeting.
(Catholic News Service)

+Continue Reading

The Top 10 Stories of June 10, 2013

Quote of the day.
"The family must release him so that God may have his own way. They must release him spiritually and put their faith in the hands of God. Once the family releases him, the people of South Africa will follow."  Andrew Mlangeni, long-time friend and anti-apartheid freedom fighter, as Nelson Mandela is admitted to the hospital in "serious but stable" condition.
(Reuters)

+Continue Reading

The Top 10 Stories of June 7, 2013

Quote of the day.
“The time of year in the United States [that] an American child is most likely to go hungry is the summertime, and the principal reason for that is school is out.” Kevin Concannon, undersecretary for food, nutrition and consumer services with the USDA, on the challenge of making sure millions of children get regular, healthy meals when they aren’t in school.
(NBC News)

+Continue Reading

The Top 10 Stories of June 6, 2013

Quote of the day.
“Few will have the greatness to bend history, but each of us can work to change a small portion of the events, and then the total — all of these acts — will be written in the history of this generation.” Robert F. Kennedy, died June 6, 1968 after being shot the previous evening; from a speech in Capetown, South Africa, June 6, 1966.
(Wikiquote)

+Continue Reading

The Top 10 Stories of June 5, 2013

Quote of the day.
"We must learn others' [American] concerns about us, and express our concerns about them, and find a way to resolve this issue. These drone strikes that rain in every day have to stop." Nawaz Sharif, in his first speech to Parliament after his election as prime minister of Pakistan was ratified.
(
BBC)  

+Continue Reading

The Top 10 Stories of June 4, 2013

Quote of the day.
“It’s the biggest fear of adoptive parents — that there is family out there looking for the child. I think people go into this with good hearts, but like many who go into the developing world and want to help, they don’t know how easy it is to hurt.” Amanda Bennett, an evangelical Christian and a lawyer in Chicago, on the pitfalls of international adoption promoted by a new evangelical Christian movement that encourages adoption as a religious and moral calling.
(New York Times)

+Continue Reading

The Top 10 Stories of June 3, 2013

 Quote of the day.

"He's mostly going to be remembered as somebody who tried to help save lives. He died doing what he loved and literally put his life on the line to save others." 

Jim Samaras, whose brother Tim, a leading “storm chaser” who had researched tornadoes by placing instruments in their path, was killed by a tornado Friday in Oklahoma. (Reuters)

1. In Congress, legislation and scandals vie for attention. Lawmakers will return to the Capitol on Monday from a weeklong recess, facing a critical juncture on immigration legislation and controversies at the Internal Revenue Service and the Justice Department that will test Congress’s ability to balance its twin responsibilities of legislating and investigating. (New York Times)  

2. Immigration reform deal hangs on border security. The Gang of Eight’s hopes for a Senate supermajority is running into the GOP’s push for a dramatic crackdown on border security — testing the limits of the bipartisan coalition that’s propelling the bill through Congress. (Politico)

3. Women in the Senate confront the military on sex assaults. The growing presence of women senators is most pronounced on the Armed Services Committee, where they have forced the long-simmering issue of sexual assault in the military to the forefront. (New York Times)  

4. Manning court martial trial starts Monday. Amid secrecy and spectacle, the long-awaited court-martial trial of WikiLeaks linchpin Bradley E. Manning starts Monday. (McClatchy News)  

5. Republican divisions over Medicaid expansion deepen further. Republican fissures over the expansion of Medicaid, a critical piece of the 2010 health-care law designed to provide coverage to millions of uninsured Americans, continue to deepen, with battles in Arizona and elsewhere showing just how bitter the divisions have become. (Washington Post)  

6. Obama can sign UN arms treaty on Monday, but advocates worry he’ll stall. President Obama is hesitant to sign an international arms trade treaty opposed by the National Rifle Association, according to advocates for the pact. Meetings with administration officials have them worried the White House doesn''t want to expend any more political capital on a treaty the NRA insists is a gun grab by the United Nations. (The Hill)

7. Protests in Turkey reveal a larger fight over identity. In full public view, a long struggle over urban spaces is erupting as a broader fight over Turkish identity, where difficult issues of religion, social class and politics intersect. (New York Times)  

8. Syrian rebels and Hezbollah clash. A number of people are killed in rare clashes on Lebanese soil between Syrian rebels and the Lebanese militant group Hezbollah, say reports. (BBC)  

9. Egypt court rules upper house of parliament elected illegally. Egypt''s supreme constitutional court (SCC) has ruled that the country''s upper house of parliament and constitution-drafting assembly were elected illegally. (Guardian)  

10. Iran talks going round in circles. The U.N. nuclear watchdog chief said on Monday talks with Iran have been "going around in circles" - unusually blunt criticism pointing to rising tension over suspected nuclear arms research by Tehran that has increased fears of a new Middle East war. (Reuters)

+Continue Reading

The Top 10 Stories of May 31, 2013

Quote of the day.
“We plan to stand with our brothers and sisters in Christ in calling for justice, compassion and fairness for the sojourners among us and for just and fair immigration reform.” Russell Moore, incoming head of the Southern Baptist Convention Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission.
(Associated Baptist Press)

+Continue Reading

The Top 10 Stories of May 30, 2013

Quote of the day.
"It may be happening, but Americans don''t like it. It is clear that a lot of Americans don''t think this is a good state of affairs." Frank Newport, Gallup''s editor in chief, on a new survey showing more than three in four of Americans say religion is losing its influence in the U.S.
(CNN Belief Blog)

+Continue Reading