The Common Good

Weekly Wrap

Weekly Wrap 8.15.14: The 10 Best Stories You Missed This Week

1. Ferguson, Mo. Police Chief Releases Name of Officer Who Shot, Killed Michael Brown
It's been almost a week since the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson. This morning, Darren Wilson, a six-year member of the department, was named as the shooter in the incident. Watch the police chief's statement at the link.

2. Matt Walsh, Robin Williams, and How Ignorance Can Lead to Unkindness
Matt Walsh recently wrote a piece about suicide and depression that represents a more systemic misunderstanding of mental illness in certain faith circles. Naked Pastor writer and artist David Hayward responds in this important piece: "I would like to help Matt Walsh and his fans understand depression, suicide, and humans."

3. Why Joseph Gordon-Levitt Considers Himself a Male Feminist
(also known as a feminist) "…If you look at history, women are an oppressed category of people. There’s a long, long history of women suffering abuse, injustice, and not having the same opportunities as men, and I think that’s been very detrimental to the human race as a whole."

4. How Did America's Police Get So Militarized? 
As the photos continue to pour out of Ferguson, Mo. of St. Louis County police dressed in riot gear and driving IED-resistant vehicles down suburban, middle-America streets, Mother Jonestakes us through the history of this now-extreme militarization of local police forces.

5. Millennials and the Myth of a Post-Racial Generation
"When police shoot down an 18-year old black teen in St Louis; when toxic power plants and incinerators are placed near communities of color; when Asian Americans are still a socially acceptable butt of racial jokes; when our nation’s capital continues to use a racial slur for its football team name, racism isn’t going anywhere anytime soon."

6. World's Top Muslim Leaders Condemn Attacks on Iraqi Christians
"Their remarks come at a time when Christian leaders in Iraq have called on Muslim leaders worldwide to denounce the anti-Christian violence in the country. In the past decade, the majority of Iraqi Christians have either fled the country or taken refuge in the autonomous region of Kurdistan."

7. Asylum PoliticsWhy are dozens of Sikh refugees being detained in an El Paso immigration facility, months after they could have been paroled? 
From Texas Monthly: "When most people think of immigration across the Mexico-U.S. border, they think of impoverished Mexicans looking for work. But more than a third of the 414,397 people who were apprehended at the southwestern border of the United States last year were from other countries, and that proportion continues to increase as the number of Mexican immigrants falls dramatically."

8. In Which, Depression Is NOT Your Fault
"Since the tragic death of Robin Williams, I have seen some terrible, misinformed, and abusive bullsh*t online about depression and mental illness. This normally wouldn’t be enough to make me type as passionately as I am right now but this stuff is coming from a few vocal and influential Christians. … Heaping condemnation and guilt and fear on the heads of the suffering is akin to tying a millstone around someone’s neck. This is a heinous and evil thing to do."

9. Trapped in Texas: Tens of Thousands of Immigrants Are Stuck in the Borderlands
"We're not Mexico, and we're not the United States. We're somewhere in between." Revealing report from Public Radio International. 

10. Humans of New York Goes International
Are you really NOT one of the 9 million people following HONY? It's time to get on board, as Brandon is on World Tour (was just in Iraq, now in Jordan), photographing and interviewing whomever he comes in contact with. Storytelling at its finest.

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Weekly Wrap 8.8.14: The 10 Best Stories You Missed This Week


1. U.S Considers Air Strikes and Air Drops to Help Iraqis Trapped on Mountain by ISIS
"The move comes as Qaraqosh, Iraq's largest Christian city, was all but abandoned as the jihadist group Islamic State (Isis) advanced through minority communities in the country's north-west and towards the Kurdish stronghold of Irbil."

2. Inclusive Language for God Does Note Equal Heresy
Rachel Marie Stone brings it on her Religion News Service blog, calling out the criticism of Gungor for supposed 'drift from biblical orthodoxy' for 'experiments with female metaphors for God' among other 'heresies.'

3. What Is Really Happening in Iraq? 
"In June, ISIS overran the northern capital of Mosul and began a violent march southward, proclaiming the imminent destruction of Kerbala, Najaf, and Baghdad — strongholds of Shi’a religious and political power. Sectarianism reignited and militias re-armed. ISIS was a Sunni problem and the Shi’a were either fleeing or beating their chests in fear. So, these few weeks later, with Christians and others being marked and driven from their homes, a Muslim movement that says, 'We are all Christians,' is subversive in the most daring of ways."

4. Dear Fashion Industry, Please Stop Glamorizing Rape
Fashion is a powerful medium and it can have a big influence in a vast country like India—and the world over. The more we depict violence against women in beautiful, glamorous ways, the more we normalize this violence.

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Weekly Wrap 8.1.14: The 10 Best Stories You Missed This Week

1. Visualization: Casualities in the Israel-Palestine Conflict
Washington Post is keeping a regularly updated tally of the deaths in the current conflict. The stunning visualization paints a grim picture.

2. I Need Feminism Because…
A Tumblr using the hashtag #WomenAgainstFeminism made the Internet rounds last week. Sojourners' writer Catherine Woodiwiss offers her take: "In a perfect world, women can choose to be whomever they want. But there is not yet a country on earth in which that is actually true. That is why we need feminism."

3. Religious Conservatives Embrace Pollution Fight
From The New York Times:"This week’s hearings on the new E.P.A. rule gave [conservatives] an opportunity to make their argument that climate change hurts the world’s poor through natural disasters, droughts and rising sea levels, and that it is part of their faith to protect the planet."

4. Wife Beating Gets a Standing Ovation in Baltimore
"… the sheer gall it takes to celebrate fans’ adoration of a man who beat his fiancee and mostly got away with it indicates the larger problem: The NFL is too big to fail."

5. The New Face of Hunger
One-sixth of Americans don't have enough food to eat. This powerful photo essay chronicles the stories in three parts of the country. Click through the gallery for the moving images.

6. New Baby Doll Is Anatomically Correct, And Moms Are Freaking Out 
"An outraged mom recently shared a photo of an anatomically correct baby doll on Facebook. I don't get it. When did it become taboo to talk about body parts with our kids?"

7. WATCH: What Would Happen if People in Poverty Received Tabloid Treatment?
A new campaign from a Canada-based service organization puts real people struggling with poverty in the place of the Kim Kardashians of the gossip-mag world. Check out the video and magazine mock-ups.

8. What's the Story of Your First Days in America?
From visiting McDonald's to questioning Southern hospitality, the fascinating series First Days documents immigrants' transition into the U.S.

9. Are You Too Proud of Your 'Natural' Lifestyle?
"While I certainly sympathize with concerns over chemicals and additives in our food, with the degradation of the environment, with the overprescribing of antibiotics and the soaring cesarean section rates, I’m keenly aware that many of the advances now freely scorned by those proudly adhering to ‘natural’ lifestyles are the very thing that make a flourishing, healthy life possible for so many people."

10. A Few Times Vandalism Did the World Some Good
While we're totally not advocating vandalism … the " … or Love the Neighbor as Thyself" response was pretty great. See all of these heroes-of-the-questionably-legal sort at the link.

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Weekly Wrap 7.18.14: The 10 Best Stories You Missed This Week

1. Germany 'May Revert to Typewriters' to Counter Hi-tech Espionage
German politicians are considering a return to using manual typewriters for sensitive documents in the wake of the US surveillance scandal. Yes, really.

2. World Cup Winners Donate Their Prize Money
Some German soccer players who took gold on Sunday—and fellow runner-ups from Argentina—both gave away portions of their earnings to charity, earning gold stars for empathy to go along with their trophy.

3. The Crisis in Israel-Palestine
Vox is keeping an up-to-date StoryStream on the developing crisis in Israel-Palestine. While world leaders call for peace, we pray.

4. Leading AIDS Researchers Among Those Killed in Malaysian Airlines Crash
Malaysian Airlines flight MH17 was shot down over Ukraine yesterday. Evidence now suggests that more than one-third of the passengers were headed to an international health conference, including leading AIDS researchers.

5. Neil Whosis? What You Don't Know About The 1969 Moon Landing
The names Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were household names in 1969. But they were all but forgotten by 1970. How did the astronauts to land on the moon pass into obscurity, and why are their names famous again now?

6. Meet The Former Call Girl Saving Hookers For Jesus 
Annie Lobert, who spent 16 years as a prostitute in Las Vegas, is running a ministry that gets women out of the sex trade.

7. Why You Should (Really, Seriously, Permanently) Stop Using Your Smartphone At Dinner
A “new paper from Virginia Tech … confirms that the mere passive presence of cellphones cheapens in-person conversation, even when we’re not looking at them.”

8. On Campus, Young Veterans Are Learning How to Be Millennials
“That difference in background made Horton see all his classes in a whole other light. His friends read Moby Dick and saw the story of a whale hunt. Horton saw a man who lost his leg and set out for vengeance … he knew what it felt like to cling to the timbers with his shipmates, hurtling forward on a mission that threatened, at any moment, to kill them all.” 

9. Watch 1,000 Balls Blast Through a Vacuum-Powered Maze
Inspired by hulking machines like CERN’s Large Hadron Collider, Roy’s contraption is a playful attempt to provide an artistic visualization to what happens in actual particle accelerators.

10. Word Crimes
“Everybody wise up!” Did you miss him? Weird Al returns with a pitch-perfect spoof on Robin Thicke’s infamous “Blurred Lines”—but this time, it’s about grammar. A catchy song on proper verb tense usage? Our web team says YES. #grammarnerds.

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Weekly Wrap 7.4.14: The 10 Best Stories You Missed This Week

1. Afghan Taliban Bans Polio Vaccination Teams
"Afghanistan is one of just three countries, along with Pakistan and Nigeria, where polio is still endemic. There has been a rise in cases this year, with seven reported so far compared with just three for the same period of 2013, according to the Global Polio Eradication Initiative."

2. Communion in a Strip Club
"I found myself in a strip club years ago. I carried a meal, and that was about all I carried. And a dancer asked me if I thought Jesus was insecure.  I quickly told her no. I told her that Jesus was entirely secure, hoping she wouldn’t try to take my Jesus away."

3. This Is What Happened When I Drove My Mercedes to Pick Up Food Stamps
The birth of twins and a job loss — stories like these illustrate how close so many people are to poverty: " … the judgment of the disadvantaged comes not just from conservative politicians and Internet trolls. It came from me, even as I was living it."

4. Dismantling the White Male Industrial Complex
Christena Cleveland argues against the logic of the white man as the secret weapon in the fight against injustice. "… rather than contributing to the white male industrial complex and focusing most/all of our justice efforts on convincing and engaging white men, I propose a different strategy …"

5. The Failure of Christian Witness in a World of Violence
"Are we contributing to the epidemic of mockery and the glorification of violence in our world with what we share from our air-conditioned living rooms? If so, then the fact that we are privileged enough to have clean hands doesn’t make us any less guilty of the violence in our world than the suicide bombers and the drones."

6. 'Life Ended There:' Rare Interviews With the Children of America's Border Disaster
POLITICO Magazine puts faces and stories to the border crisis in this must-read.

7. How Hot Is It? Hot Enough to Ruin the Economy
“The increased number of excessively hot days guaranteed to come with the changing climate has the potential to dramatically denigrate worker productivity, according to recent study. … Productivity figures to be the biggest economic hit, though energy costs will certainly give it a run for its, uh, money.”

8. Cory Booker, Rand Paul Shine Light on Shadow Side of U.S. Justice System
A new proposal pairs an unlikely duo to confront the injustice of mass incarceration. Read what brought the two together to find common ground.

9. How It Feels to Love and Hate a Sex Offender
"Most people do not understand how sex offenders function and therefore do not realize the depth of their damage. … In the healing process, I've learned that the families of sex offenders, the secondary victims, just like primary victims, must learn to do basic things even when all our beliefs and emotions scream it is not safe."

10. This Land Is Their Land :The Braves, Chiefs, and Washington NFL Team All Play on Land Seized from American Indians
“It is easy to assert that the name of your favorite team expresses solidarity with the survivors of the long, sordid history of Indian dispossession. But what if sports lore included the specifics of how the U.S. acquired the land below your team’s home field?”

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Weekly Wrap 7.4.14: The 10 Best Stories You Missed This Week

1. Five Takeaways From the Hobby Lobby Case
Five things to know about one of the biggest Supreme Court decisions of the year.

2. Who’s Afraid of Soccer in America?
The beautiful game captured the imagination of the United States as its national team advanced to the knockout rounds to fall valiantly at the hands — or feet, rather — of Belgium. And the numbers don't lie: soccer is taking off in America.

3. Tim Howard: 'Nuff Said
Speaking of the World Cup, goal keeper Tim Howard did the best he could to keep the U.S. in it. The shot-stopper has taken the Internet by storm, with #ThingsTimHowardCouldSave trending on Twitter, hilarious Tim Howard memes abounding, a petition to change the name of Washington National Airport (DCA) to "Tim Howard National Airport" going viral. The man even received a call from Obama himself.

4. Here's How Vancouver Responded to London's 'Anti-Homeless Spikes'
A Vancouver charity, RainCity Housing, is converting city benches into pop-up shelters for homeless people. And by giving homeless people in this rainy city some dry coverage and a place to rest, RainCity is putting London's anti-homeless spikes to shame. 

5. 10,000 Christians Have Fled Northern Iraq Since the ISIS Takeover
As many as 10,000 people have fled from predominantly Christian areas in northern Iraq, the U.N. warned late last week.

6. In open primary Southern states, black voters flex new muscle
An unexpected group of voters charged in to save veteran Mississippi Senator Thad Cochran, a Republican, from losing a primary squeaker against a tea party challenger: African American Democrats.

7. Plastic garbage on ocean's surface is vanishing. Where is it going?
Large amounts of the plastic debris littering the ocean's surface seem to be disappearing. But scientists are at a loss to explain where it's going.

8. Bathrobes And Baby Carriers: The Stuff Of Manliness?
NPR's All Things Considered asks, "What Object Makes You Feel Manly?" One man gives an answer that steers away from masculine stereotypes.

9. 3 Lessons from Wild Goose: Holy Rest, Holy Mischief, and Holy Reconciliation
"This past week I was surrounded by an eclectic mix of barefoot wanderers, edgy thinkers, and hippie-hipsters at the Wild Goose festival. While none of these descriptors necessarily apply to me, I found myself quite at home at the Goose." 

10. Astronaut Reid Wiseman Has an Out of This World Twitter Feed
Reid Wiseman is up in space taking insane photos — definitely worth following on Twitter.

 
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Weekly Wrap 6.27.14: The 10 Best Stories You Missed This Week

1. WATCH: Powerful Ad Shows What A Little Girl Hears When You Tell Her She's Pretty
“A new Verizon commercial cites a sad statistic by the National Science Foundation: 66 percent of 4th grade girls say they like science and math, but only 18 percent of all college engineering majors are female.”

2.Sandy Hook Dad on What You Can Do Right Now to Help Prevent Violence 
“'Pick your eyes up from the sidewalk and look at people,' Mr. Barden pleaded, with tears in his eyes. Yes, we should call our representatives; yes, we should make our voices heard where laws are made. But we should also do what we can to foster empathy; to create a world where no one feels invisible and ignored — least of all those who disproportionately fall victim to our collective failure to care enough to act."

3. Facebook VP: Stop Portraying Me as Mother-of-Four Who 'Wanted it All''
"'When I got my post at Facebook it was all about how I was a mother-of-four who had 'won' the position, alongside pictures of my wedding,' she said, noting that the male executive hired at the same time came under no such scrutiny. Reports also said she insisted on working part-time, when in fact she was working a typical five-day week."

4. FIFA Go Home: Inside Brazilians' Struggle to Challenge World Cup 
From Mashable: "Their goal isn't so much to change the current World Cup in any specific way; it's more to challenge — and, ideally, impact — the mainstream narrative surrounding the tournament, shifting its focus to the event's human costs and larger political context. To the billions spent on stadiums that won't be used again and the millions living in abject poverty."

5. Ikea to Raise Its Average Minimum Hourly Wage to $10.76 
"The happier the co-worker, the happier the customer and the better the overall shopping experience," said Ikea's acting U.S. president, Rob Olson. "We wanted to be less concerned about the competition and more concerned about offering our co-workers a better everyday life."

6. The Decency of a Nation
A new index attempts to measure the 'goodness' of nations — based on the way they treat other nations, science and technology, culture, equality, etc. (Spoiler: guess who doesn't break the top 10.)

7.WATCH: 'Columbusing': When White People Think They Discovered Something They Didn't 
"Macklemore Columbused same-sex marriage, just like Gwyneth Paltrow Columbused Eastern medicine."

8.Use of Drones for Killings Risks a War Without End 
A bipartisan panel concluded that the use of armed drones "sets a dangerous precedent for lethal operations that other countries might adopt in the future," according to the New York Times.

9. Detroit Activists Call for UN Help as City Shuts Off Water for Thousands 
“Detroit has too much of some things – stray dogs, abandoned houses – and not enough of others, such as residents who pay their water bills. The latest sign of Detroit’s decline came from the city’s water department, when it said in March it would begin shutting off water for up to 3,000 homes and businesses a week in an attempt to stop the utility from sliding even further into debt.”

10. PHOTOS: Inside a Detention Center for Migrant Children 
The Customs and Border Patrol is overwhelmed by a flood of minors entering the U.S. from Central America.

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Weekly Wrap 6.20.14: The 10 Best Stories You Missed This Week

1. WATCH LIVE: The Summit: World Change Through Faith & Justice
Today is the last day of The Summit. Live stream Summit Sessions Unlocking Solutions to Disarm Injustice: Mass Incarceration & Gun Violence at 1 p.m. EDT and The Final Push: The Immigration Reform Debateat 7 p.m. EDT. 

2. The Devastating Issue Pastors Aren't Discussing
A groundbreaking new poll shows the large discrepancy between pastors' belief that domestic and sexual violence is a problem in their local communities and their belief that it is a problem in their congregations.

3. To Publish a Predator
Christianity Today's Leadership Journal recently published a first-hand narrative from a pastor who entered into a sexual relationship with a minor — framed around the concept of sin. The post spurred a Twitter firestorm using the hashtag #TakeDownThatPost. They did, and CT''s her.meneutics blog responds. 

4. The Number of People Displaced by Violent Conflict at the End of 2013 Exceeded 51 Million
"The number of people displaced by violent conflict hit the highest level since World War II at the end of 2013, the head of the United Nations refugee agency, António Guterres, said in a report released on Friday, warning that “peace is dangerously in deficit.”

5. Presbyterians in U.S. to Allow Gay Marriage Ceremonies
The PC(USA) voted at its Detroit gathering this week to allow clergy to perform same-sex marriages wherever they are legal. 

6. Russell Moore Weighs in on Hobby Lobby's China Dealings
Jonathan Merritt says Hobby Lobby cannot be considered a Christian business because of the ethical implications in its business dealings with China. "Because they’ve chosen to label their business as “Christian,” I think it is wholly fair to raise this issue." In his Religion News Service blog, he gives Russell Moore, president of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, a chance to respond.

7. The Places They'll Go: Nuns Working on the Margins
"If you happen upon a forgotten corner of desperate poverty or a neglected collection of humanity, chances are good that a religious woman has arrived before you."

8. Rape Victims Say Bob Jones University Told Them To Repent
In this piece for Al Jazeera America, women survivors of rape while attending BJU during the course of three different decades share their stories. "… most damaging was how, through the language of Scripture, victims say they were told that their sins had brought on their rapes, that their trauma meant they were fighting God and that healing came from forgiving their rapists." 

9. And watch the related three-part series: How the 'fortress of faith' handles rape.

10. How Cities Use Design to Drive Homeless People Away
"It has been encouraging to see the outrage over the London spikes. But the spikes that caused the uproar are by no means the only form of homeless-deterrent technology; they are simply the most conspicuous. Will public concern over the spikes extend to other less obvious instances of anti-homeless design? Perhaps the first step lies in recognizing the political character of the devices all around us."

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Weekly Wrap 6.13.14: The 10 Best Stories You Missed This Week

1. In Extremists' Iraq Rise, America's Legacy 

"First Falluja, then Mosul, and now the oil-refinery town of Bayji. The rapid advance of Al Qaeda-inspired militants across the Sunni heartland of northern and western Iraq has been stunning and relentless — and utterly predictable. Here’s a forecast: the bad news is just beginning."  

2Obama Says He Will Decide on Military Force for Iraq in 'Days Ahead' 
"This poses a danger to Iraq and its people and, given the nature of these terrorists, it could pose a threat eventually to American interests as well," Mr. Obama said of the offensive now threatening Baghdad. "We will not be sending U.S. troops back into combat in Iraq, but I have asked my national security team to prepare a range of other options."

3. Ruby Dee, Actress and Civil Rights Activist, Dies at 91 
"Over the course of Ms. Dee’s career, the lives of American blacks, both extraordinary and ordinary, belatedly emerged as rich subject matter for mainstream theater productions and films, and black performers went from being consigned to marginal and often belittling roles to starring in Hollywood mega-hits. … But Ms. Dee not only took part in that evolution; through her visibility in a wide range of projects, from classics onstage to contemporary film dramas to television soap operas, she also helped bring it about."  

4. 5 Problems with Throwing Immigrants in Separate, Private Prisons 
From Vox, a breakdown of just one of the many problems with the current immigration system: "These facilities only house non-citizens, most of whom will be deported after their terms are completed — meaning the federal government is willing to set lower standards for their treatment in some respects than they do for other inmates."  

5. WATCH: High School Boys Prove Feminism Is For Everyone 
"High school teacher Ileana Jimenez, who clearly deserves some sort of award, recorded seven of her students sharing their thoughts on feminism. And they are so, so refreshing you want to reach through the screen and hug those young dudes."  

6. It's Really Hard to Be a Good Guy With a Gun 
"The universe of scenarios in which carrying a gun seems prudent or useful just keeps shrinking and shrinking, even as the legal freedom to wield personal firepower keeps expanding. The NRA has recalibrated its message for the 21st century: ''The only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun.'' But in many ways, the 21st century has already overtaken us good guys."  

7. The World Cup of Food 
It's Brazil's feijoada v. Croatia's roasted lamb pod pekoe. Belguim frites v. Algerian tchakshoukha. And, of course, Ghananian red red takes on U.S. BBQ. Follow along to see what delicious dishes get kicked out in the first round.   

8. Bergdahl Explains in Prison Letters Why He Vanished 
“In the 2013 letter, he seems to be well aware the U.S. army was investigating his disappearance from his base. … He sets about explaining why he left his base, in poorly spelled block print.”  

9. Confronting Racism Face-to-Face 
“Mo Asumang, daughter of a black Ghanaian father and a white German mother, talks to BBC News about her experiences making her new documentary, The Aryans, in which she confronts racists, both in Germany and among the Ku Klux Klan in America.”  

10. Starting Wednesday: Live Stream The Summit: World Change Through Faith & Justice 
The Summit kicks off on Wednesday. It's a 4-day event that intends to create a space to build relationships and inspire social change. That success is based on the contributions of every person involved. That includes YOU — at home, at school — on the ground, making a difference. Since not everyone can come to us, we’re coming to you! Interact with the speakers by Tweeting #summitforchange or texting in your questions.

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Weekly Wrap 6.5.14: The 10 Best Stories You Missed This Week

1. Seattle Pacific University Grieves After Deadly Shooting
"'When the darkness closes in, Lord, still I will say, blessed be the name of the Lord,' they sang. And they cried. And they raised their arms high. And when the hymn ended, new words hit the screen: '#PrayforSPU.'"

2. INTERACTIVE: D-Day Landing Scenes in 1944 and Now
From The Guardian: Peter Macdiarmid has taken photographs of locations in France and England to match with archive images taken before, during and after the D-day landings. Check out the stunning changes.

3. Four-in-Ten Pakistanis Say Honor Killings of Women Can Be At Least Sometimes Justified
The killing of a 25-year-old pregnant woman because she married without her family's consent in Pakistan has drawn international outrage. But so-called honor killings claim the lives of more than 1,000 Pakistani women every year.

4. Remembering Tiananmen
"Recently, as NPR’s Beijing correspondent, she took the famous picture from this time of “Tank Man” — a lone student standing in front of Chinese tanks — to contemporary university students in Beijing, asking if they could identify the iconic photo. Of 100 students, only 15 knew what it was, and they didn’t wish to discuss it. Their names were withheld out of respect for their anxiety."

5. The Problem With Biblical Authority
N.T. Wright writes for On Faith: "The risen Jesus doesn’t say, “All authority in heaven and earth is given to . . . the books you chaps are going to go and write.” He says, “All authority has been given to me.” The phrase authority of scripture can only, at its best, be a shorthand for the authority of God in Jesus, mediated through scripture."

6. The Heated Battle for Cooled Texas Prisons
Extreme heat has killed nearly twenty people housed in correctional facilities. Now, inmates and guards have banded together to fight for improved conditions.

7. The Church Has Been Left Behind
"It is as if the church is stuck with the disciples in wondering when Jesus will restore Christendom to Christianity. It is as if the church has mistaken cultural normativity, full pews, big buildings, political influence, and societal power for the Holy Spirit. It is as if the church has forgotten the great commission to witness to Christ in their local towns, states, and to the ends of the earth. It is if the church is afraid of being left behind."

8. The Lives of America's Homeless
At St. Stephen's Human Services in Minneapolis, Margaret Miles is creating oral and photographic histories of homeless people across Minnesota. "Somebody said, 'Gosh, that actually looks like the guy who drives my kids' school bus.' Well in fact it could be, and he could not be making enough money, or could have had a health crisis, or a divorce, or some other reason, and he's driving your kids and loving your kids and caring for your kids during his day job, and then having to sleep at night in a shelter."

9. Candidates Who Signed Anti-Immigration Pledge Are Losing Their Primaries
"In total*, 21 FAIR pledge signers lost to non-signers. Only two pledge signers have won so far in races where they were pitted against a non-signer."

10. National Donut Day 2014: Where To Go To Get Your Free Doughnuts
But, "most importantly," today is National Donut Day. Go (do)Nuts!

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