The Common Good

The Top 10 Stories of May 9, 2013

Quote of the day.
“In the clothing industry, everybody wears it every day, but we have no idea where it comes from. People are starting to slowly clue in to this notion of where products are made.” Michael Preysman, chief executive and founder of Everlane, an online boutique, which is adding to its website photographs of factories where that clothing is made and information about the production.
(New York Times)

1. Senate begins debate on immigration bill.
The Senate will begin a historic debate Thursday that could overhaul the nation’s immigration system. Senators will get their first crack at modifying or killing legislation proposed by a bipartisan group of eight colleagues.
(McClatchy News)

2. NRA-Giffords fight heats up. 
The National Rifle Association and new pro-gun control groups headed by former Rep. Gabby Giffords and Michael Bloomberg are in an arms race since a background check bill narrowly failed in the Senate last month — ramping up their fundraising, airing attack ads, and revving up their grassroots machines.
(Politico)

3. Lawmaker wants military to promptly alert Congress about drone strikes.
A leading House Republican said Wednesday that he wants to require the U.S. military to “promptly” inform Congress about every drone strike it conducts outside Afghanistan as well as other military operations to kill or capture suspected terrorists outside declared war zones.
(Washington Post)

4. Nun, 83, and two other activists guilty of intent to injure national security.
An 83-year-old Catholic nun and two of her fellow peace activists were found guilty Wednesday of intending to harm national security when they intruded in July onto the Y-12 National Security Complex, a nuclear-weapons production facility in Oak Ridge, Tenn.
(Washington Post)

5. Foes suggest a tradeoff if pipeline is approved.
President Obama’s first major environmental decision of his second term could be to approve the Keystone XL pipeline, profoundly disappointing environmental advocates who have made the project a symbolic test of the president’s seriousness on climate change.
(New York Times)

6. In hearing on Benghazi attack, new facts are few but politics plentiful.
A much anticipated congressional hearing Wednesday on the September 2012 attacks on U.S. diplomatic compounds in Benghazi, Libya, produced no major revelations but plenty of partisan fireworks as Republicans renewed charges that the Obama administration had covered up details of what took place while Democrats retorted that politics is driving the GOP-run investigation.
(McClatchy News)

7. New diplomatic push to end civil war in Syria.
As new reports of violence flowed from Syria, Secretary of State John Kerry telephoned leaders in Europe and the Middle East on Wednesday to lay the groundwork for a conference between rebels and the Syrian government, sponsored by the United States and Russia, that he hoped would begin within a month.
(New York Times)

8. Afghan president ready to let U.S. have 9 bases.
The U.S. wants to keep nine bases in Afghanistan after American combat troops withdraw in 2014 and the Afghan government will let them as long as it gets "security and economic guarantees," President Hamid Karzai said Thursday in his first public offer in talks about the future relationship between the two uneasy allies.
(Associated Press)

9. Senate bill aims to toughen Iran sanctions.
A bipartisan group of senators introduced legislation Wednesday that would sharply toughen U.S. economic sanctions on Iran despite administration calls for Congress to delay penalties that could disrupt diplomacy aimed at resolving the dispute over Iran's nuclear program.
(Chicago Tribune/Los Angeles Times)

10. World Bank turns to hydropower to square development with climate change.
The World Bank is making a major push to develop large-scale hydropower projects around the globe, something it had all but abandoned a decade ago but now sees as crucial to resolving the tension between economic development and the drive to tame carbon use.
(Washington Post)

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