The Common Good

The Top 10 Stories of July 19, 2012

Quote of the day.
"I think I have come a long, long way from when I was ordained. It isn’t about serving the church in the way you have envisioned, from the altar, and from the position of authority and power. But it is learning what human nature is, and what the struggles of people are. And where Jesus really is." - Msgr. Gerald Ryan, 92, New York City's oldest working priest, has been a quiet force behind his Bronx community.
(New York Times)

1. Judge grants Tenn. mosque's petition to open.
Muslims in a Tennessee congregation prepared Thursday for the holy month of Ramadan a day after a federal judge ruled they have a right to occupy their newly built mosque, overruling a county judge''s order that was keeping them out.
(Associated Press)

2. Christian charity ready to defy Philadelphia ban on feeding homeless.
A Christian group in Philadelphia is fighting a city ban on feeding homeless people and has vowed that regardless of any fines, they will continue doing the work Christ sent his followers to do.
(Christian Post)

3. Domestic programs brace for sequester’s ax.
For all the hysteria in Washington over sequestration, you’d be forgiven for believing it only affects defense. But nobody seems to be talking about the other $500 billion in reductions — to Head Start, child care and AIDS programs, as well as many other domestic programs that face across-the-board cuts.
(Politico)

4. Drought to drive up cost of dairy.
The heat and drought ravaging much of the nation will soon hit America at the supermarket counter: Cheese and milk prices will rise first and corn and meat are probably not far behind.
(USA Today)

5. U.S. recession's other victim: public universities.
The public university system is fracturing, with states slashing funding just as attendance has soared. As a result, public universities, which have graduated the majority of college students, are eliminating programs and becoming less accessible.
(Reuters)

6. Relatives sue officials over U.S. citizens killed by drone strikes.
The lawsuit was filed by relatives of three citizens who died in drone strikes, including the radical Muslim cleric, Anwar al-Awlaki, and has opened a new chapter in the legal wrangling over the use of drones.
(New York Times)

7. Fighting rages on across Syrian capital.
Intense fighting between the opposition and government forces is raging in a half-dozen areas of the Syrian capital Damascus, the day after a bomb struck at the heart of Syria's senior command, killing at least three of President Bashar al-Assad's top brass.
(Al Jazeera)

8. Washington begins to plan for collapse of Syrian government.
With the growing conviction that the Assad family’s 42-year grip on power in Syria is coming to an end, Obama administration officials worked on contingency plans Wednesday for a collapse of the Syrian government, focusing particularly on the chemical weapons that Syria is thought to possess and that President Bashar al-Assad could try to use on opposition forces and civilians.
(New York Times)

9. Bulgaria says suicide bomber blew up airport bus.
A suicide bomber carried out an attack that killed seven people in a bus transporting Israeli tourists in Bulgaria, the country's interior minister said on Thursday, and Israel said Iranian-backed Hezbollah militants were to blame.
(Reuters)

10. Iraq war reconstruction: $6 billion to $8 billion wasted.
The official in charge of monitoring America’s $51 billion effort to reconstruct Iraq has estimated that $6 billion to $8 billion of that amount was lost to waste, fraud and abuse.
(NBC News)

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