The Common Good

Singing and Praying Justice, Part 1

"He who sings prays twice." -- Saint Augustine

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"What's going on?" -- Marvin Gaye

The soundtrack of the 1970s still speaks to us. Life, as many had known it, was rapidly changing back then. A generation had found its revolutionary voice and was confronting oppression domestically and abroad. Disenchantment with status quo Americanism had sparked the nation's social consciousness. And from the center of this whirlwind emerged a cry for deep justice.

A singer captured the ethos of the age: "What's going on?" he asked.

War, social decay, and racial unrest conspired against a generation. Too many mothers were crying, too many brothers dying. "We don't need to escalate," he urged. Please stop judging and punishing picket signs with brutality. "We've got to find a way to bring some lovin' here today."

Fast-forward almost 40 years and Marvin Gaye's music feels as timely as ever.

At its core, the Gospel is a story about a loving God who reconciles humanity into loving relationships with Himself, themselves, and each other. Justice fits into the story as Christ rights the wrongs that prevent those relationships. Worship as both music and lifestyle should reflect this. But does it?

In a world marked by wars, genocide, street gangs and terror thugs, ethnocentrism, generational poverty, famine, AIDS, substandard housing and education, rampant materialism, religious hatred, and environmental degradation, where's the lovin' in our church music? The kind of lovin' that rights wrongs and reconciles relationships?

The songs that typically rank as the "most popular" in mainstream evangelical churches today are filled with beautiful expressions of God's holiness and love. But they seem to lack a consistent emphasis on worship that moves beyond a personal experience to include a clear declaration of the social-justice dimension of God's activity in the world.

Sadly, too often our church music is directed inward as a distorted, selfish facsimile of worship. We long for God to meet personal needs and mediate justice on our own behalf, radically reducing our songs to individualized laundry lists of wants. Consider these popular contemporary worship song lyrics:

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