The Common Good

The Other Dimension of the Game

I have been thinking much about this slogan or caption, "the other dimension of the game." It is a slick and catchy phrase I have been exposed to in my work with Streetfootballworld -- a strategic partner of FIFA in the 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa. Streetfootballworld is concerned with development through football. The game of football has another side, another dimension, and it is exciting to be a part of a festival organizing team that delivers the Football for Hope Centre Kick Off-2009 and the Football for Hope Festival-2010. You can learn more about Streetfootballworld by visiting www.streetfootballworld.org.

In my current work as operations coordinator, and my continued consulting and training and development, this theme "the other dimension of the game" has captured my thoughts. Our daily life could be considered as a game that for some is filled with adventure, achievement, and success, and for others is filled with anxiety, alienation, and struggle. It is a most valuable exercise to reflect on "the other dimension of the game" or "the other dimension of life" -- for my reality is not the reality of another. In the world we live in, there is growing need for everyday people to be learned in the practice of considering the other and the dimension of life that one may not be seeing.

In the recent drama surrounding Caster Semenya, there are certain realities that prevail concerning ethnic and gender bias. Semenya's professional athletic record lies in the hands of people and tests that scrutinize her person and her being. One must wonder what dimension of the game was missing in the happenings surroundings this young, dynamic, and triumphant person. Could it be the dimension of human rights was not in focus? Could it be the dimension of caution to protect a person, instead of bringing open rebuke and international destructive propaganda?

It is my hope to go about my work at Streetfootballworld being mindful of "the other dimension of the game." It is my hope that every facet of my personal and professional life will be concerned with the social, development, justice, and human rights dimension of life. May people all over our world be captured by the efforts, programs, and causes that focus on "the other dimension of life." The dimension that is easier left ignored and marginalized. A dimension that falls outside the framework of a globalized, profit-making market economy!

The world of football/soccer has in some ways recognised the other dimension. May we live to see a day when politics and economics are engaged with the other dimension of their game! It is possible to go about our lives with a socially astute ethic that seeks to bring about a better world for all humanity!

Consider today your life and the people that are in your ethos: Which dimensions of your everyday existence are not apparent to you? Do you see and understand the depth of complexity in which your fellow colleague or neighbour exists? Are you intentionally considering "the other dimension of the game" in the game of life that you play every day?

Seth NaickerSeth Naicker is an activist for justice and reconciliation from South Africa. He can be reached at seth-naicker@bethel.edu or smnaick@hotmail.com.

Sojourners relies on the support of readers like you to sustain our message and ministry.

Related Stories

Resources

Like what you're reading? Get Sojourners E-Mail updates!

Sojourners Comment Community Covenant

I will express myself with civility, courtesy, and respect for every member of the Sojourners online community, especially toward those with whom I disagree, even if I feel disrespected by them. (Romans 12:17-21)

I will express my disagreements with other community members' ideas without insulting, mocking, or slandering them personally. (Matthew 5:22)

I will not exaggerate others' beliefs nor make unfounded prejudicial assumptions based on labels, categories, or stereotypes. I will always extend the benefit of the doubt. (Ephesians 4:29)

I will hold others accountable by clicking "report" on comments that violate these principles, based not on what ideas are expressed but on how they're expressed. (2 Thessalonians 3:13-15)

I understand that comments reported as abusive are reviewed by Sojourners staff and are subject to removal. Repeat offenders will be blocked from making further comments. (Proverbs 18:7)