The Common Good

Articles By Rose Marie Berger

Who do you call when the marshals have tossed all your belongings on the sidewalk and you need a place to spend the night?
For the first time, you can possess your very own Holy Trinity 3-pak, featuring hand-carved God hair, a glow-in-the-dark Holy Spirit, and LEGO Jesus.
A 2001 U.S. Army Audit Agency report revealed that U.S. armed forces are unprepared for encountering chemical and biological weapons.
President Bush finally signed the Sudan Peace Act in October to pressure the Sudanese government to end that nation's 19-year civil war...
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As Christians, how do we live in times like these?
Around the world publicly owned, government-run water utilities are being sold off to for-profit companies.
At the corner of 14th and Euclid Streets NW in Washington, D.C., many evenings at sunset, the Domino's deliveryman kneels down to pray.
This spring, the Survey Research Center at the University of Akron surveyed 587 leaders of faith-based organizations with government contracts under federal programs...
Weapons sales to developing countries last year reached their lowest level in eight years, according to a new report by the Congressional Research Service.
The Swedish appliance manufacturer ASKO dropped advertising that mocked eating disorders in response to a campaign effort by the U.S.-based organization Dads and Daughters.
There's more to the Lummi totem pole than meets the eye. At a time when Americans asked themselves "What can I do?" in response to the Sept.
Wondering what to wear to the next Bible study or church potluck? Need high visibility clothing for jogging at night?
Colombia's U'wa indigenous group, numbering only 5,000, feared for their survival when U.S.-based Occidental Petroleum began plans nearly a decade ago to drill on their lands.
Western Pennsylvania's Citizens Budget Campaign met last spring with the Pittsburgh City Council to discuss the impact of the 2003 federal budget on their city.
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'The work isn't over until we close our eyes and die.'
The ceramic arsenal of Charles Krafft.
Is breaking the silence always a good thing?
The Glasgow University Media Group decided to research how much about the Middle East conflict students learned from watching TV. This is what they found.
Two-hundred-seventy Haitian refugees—including children—have been held for more than six months in a maximum-security prison
Brazilian popular educator Paulo Freire probably never thought his ideas would revolutionize the fashion industry, but his student Maria Teresa Romeiro Leal has done just that. 
In June, the African Religious Leaders Assembly on Children and HIV/AIDS met in Nairobi at the request of the Hope for African Children Initiative and the World Conference of Religions and Peace. 
The world now has purple M&Ms, but hold your applause for the little chocolates until the West African cocoa fields are rid of child slavery.
Daring Deeds. In June, seven women gathered on a boat on the Danube in Austria to be ordained as Roman Catholic priests.
Christian leaders from all U.S.
Here's the perfect gift for the hard-to-shop-for Lutheran in your life, or for that matter any friendly neighborhood church reformer.
Nurit Elhanan and her husband, Rami, both 52, are campaigning for an end to the Israeli occupation of the Palestinian territories. What's remarkable about their peace campaign?
College, credit cards, and students: A dangerous mix?
Twelve of the world's top 20 megacities are in Asia and the Pacific. Tokyo, with more than 26 million people, is currently the world's largest city.
The Nonviolent Peaceforce is putting soldiers in the field.
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At Wimbledon in 2002, tennis great Serena Williams was asked how it felt to be number one in the world.
John H. Timmerman's incisive look at poet Jane Kenyon could use a snappier title because, more than a "literary life," it is a quintessential modern American spiritual journey.
The Christian Coalition of Georgia, along with Peace State Methodist and Baptist churches, are in a pitched battle to close down the state's video poker machines.
International relief organizations in Kabul are employing 3,500 women bakers to ensure that more than a quarter of a million Afghan school children are fed during the school year.
Clergy, labor, and civil rights groups protested with employees outside a Miami nursing home after the management filed objections with the National Labor Relations Board...
First he took off his hat and coat; then his sweater and shirt.
It's the perfect Jackson & Perkins rose for fresh-cut arrangements—velvety bright true red petals on the outside, hardy and disease-resistant on the inside.
In Colorado, ranchers and environmentalists are collaborating in a common cause—protecting water rights and sustainable land use.
Silence Please. A Catholic priest in Spain has installed a state-of-the-art electronic jamming system in the church to silence the ringers on cellular phones.
Worshippers at St. Mary's Episcopal Cathedral, in Glasgow, Scotland, are now sharing pews with Scotland's most avant-garde artists.
The good news that's meant to be tossed! "Slip It and Flip It!" That's right!
The Archbishop of Canterbury, in his annual New Years speech last year, warned that his grandson would "discover a world of shocking inequality..."
Tapping the pristine Arctic National Wildlife Refuge for oil—which Congress forestalled—would hardly make a dent in the 8-million-barrel-a-day foreign oil addiction of the United States.
One average American uses 17 gallons of water daily in the shower. South African women together walk the equivalent of a round trip to the moon 16 times a day to get water.
New Moon: The Magazine for Girls and Their Dreams is turning Hollywood inside out by challenging the film industry's harmful depictions of women and girls...