New Citizenship Debate: In Vitro Babies

By the Web Editors 03-21-2012
Mother and baby, emin kuliyev, Shutterstock.com

Mother and baby, emin kuliyev, Shutterstock.com

In a spin on the immigration debate, USA Today explores the murkiness of in vitro fertilization abroad. Americans who give birth outside the states via in vitro are required to prove at least one biological parent is a U.S. citizen.

The problem? In many in vitro cases, neither the sperm or the egg come from the parent.

"I was humiliated and horrified," Ellie Lavi, an American citizen who gave birth in Tel Aviv, told USA Today. "We're talking about the children I gave birth to. Of course they're my children."

U.S. regulations allow children adopted abroad to receive citizenship, but the laws haven't caught up with technology and the growing number of women opting for in vitro. 

Read full article HERE.

Mother and baby, emin kuliyev, Shutterstock.com

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